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The only polish word a foreigner won't ever say correctly :P



James Revan   Feb 1, 2008, 02:18pm /  #


I dare ya :P


(just a stupid thing that will be deleted anyway)

paczka   Feb 1, 2008, 04:02pm /  #
Is it a real word or just a random string? :-0

osiol   Feb 1, 2008, 04:06pm /  #
Looks too easy. Not enough consonant clusters, but nice usage of all the symbols.

RJ_cdn   Feb 1, 2008, 04:09pm /  #
James Revan wrote:
The only polish word a foreigner won't ever say correctly

I am pretty sure that you can't say it either.

Krzysztof   Feb 1, 2008, 05:10pm /  #
James Revan wrote:

James Revan wrote:
just a stupid thing

I have to agree on the last part :)

1/ no words in Polish begin with "" (neither with "" or "")
2/ "" - that's totally impossible, before vowels "" becomes "zi"
3/ I don't recall any words that would have the sequence of "", or ""

but keep trying :)

osiol   Feb 1, 2008, 05:14pm /  #
󳱶?

James Revan   Feb 1, 2008, 05:25pm /  #
󿱶

osiol   Feb 1, 2008, 05:26pm /  #
James Revan wrote:

I avoided that - it somehow just didn't look right.

plk123   Feb 1, 2008, 05:35pm /  #
paczka wrote:
a random string?
it is that

Krzysztof Edited by: Krzysztof    Feb 1, 2008, 05:42pm /  #
I know one Polish word with only "special" letters, (in Nominative), and it's

"" [bile/gall], but of course it's not that bad to pronounce.

but words that are phonetically challenging don't have to include too many Polish letters, it's the sounds order untypical to other languages that makes them hard to say. Most Poles (native speakers) can't pronounce correctly "jabko" [apple] - we rather say it as "japko", or "gupi" [stupid/dumb] - in a relaxed speech it sounds like "gupi"

osiol   Feb 1, 2008, 05:56pm /  #
I find the 'u' in 'sucham' a bit tricky. It just comes out as 'sucham'.

El Gato   Feb 1, 2008, 05:58pm /  #
osiol wrote:
sucham


listening to

or

searching for

???

hancock   Feb 1, 2008, 07:23pm /  #
its "listening to"

is a very soft L with the tounge behind the teeth and a a slight vibration behind the throat.

El Gato   Feb 1, 2008, 07:30pm /  #
hancock wrote:
its "listening to"

is a very soft L with the tounge behind the teeth and a a slight vibration behind the throat.


OMG. Can't believe I even asked that question. I didn't notice the little cross in the "l" so I though he mis-spelled the word...

z_darius Edited by: z_darius    Feb 1, 2008, 09:55pm /  #
osiol wrote:
James Revan wrote:


I avoided that - it somehow just didn't look right.

You did well here.
Each language allows some consonnat clusters while others are not allowed. Neither English nor Polish are exceptions in this regard.

For instance in: 󿱶 (above) the is not possible in Polish.
Additionally, some consonant/vowels combinations (such as "") do not occur in Polish.

Bottom line, the challenge of the original post is not an exercise in the Polish pronounciation.

Davey   Feb 1, 2008, 11:58pm /  #
hancock wrote:
is a very soft L with the tounge behind the teeth and a a slight vibration behind the throat.


I'll stick to the English 'w' on that one....

kioko   Feb 2, 2008, 03:33am /  #
What about "chrzszcz" ? :P

James Revan   Feb 2, 2008, 04:36am /  #
chrzszcz szczy w pszczynie - a little harder then the original "chrzszcz brzmi w trzcinie"

kioko   Feb 2, 2008, 04:47am /  #
http://pl.wikiquote.org/wiki/%C5%81ama%C5%84ce_j%C4%99zykowe

lonely   Feb 2, 2008, 05:05am /  #
haha this is a funny thread

Bartolome   Feb 2, 2008, 06:32am /  #
James Revan wrote:
chrzszcz szczy w pszczynie

Try something better:
Chrzszcz pszczo w trzcinie pieprzy :)

osiol   Feb 2, 2008, 07:40am /  #
Are there any consonant clusters in English that Polish speakers have difficulty with?
I ask that assuming the answer to be found in words like 'Twelfths'.

There may be other languages that would pose a Pole a problem or two.
In Georgian, allegedly, there can be as many as 6 consonants in a row without a single vowel sound to break it up and make it any easier.

starchild Edited by: starchild    Feb 2, 2008, 07:55am /  #
I don't want to speak for all Polish speakers, but I know at least one who can't say crisps. Always comes out as crips! Actually, comes out as Lays because he's sick of me saying crisps at him!


Edit:
Word with five consonants in a row - angsts.
I've got loads of these, up to and beyond eighthly!

Oh and just for Osiol:
In Georgian, GVPRTSKVNI (you peel us) is a one-syllable word [Benjamin Schak].

Bushman   Feb 2, 2008, 08:32am /  #
My Fiance (who's polish) couldn't say it... ROTFLOL!! And she gives me hassles because i'm not learning polish quickly enough... wish it was a real word though :-p

osiol   Feb 2, 2008, 08:37am /  #
starchild wrote:
In Georgian, GVPRTSKVNI (you peel us) is a one-syllable word

I don't suppose this word is used all that often.
Must look up some facts about popular pastimes in Georgia.

Seanus   Feb 2, 2008, 09:29am /  #
Szczur is hard to get right. Even ptak isn't as easy as it seems. My girlfriend says I say 'pitak' rather than a merged 'pt' sound. I don't agree but she's the expert on this one so I acquiesce here

Krzysztof   Feb 2, 2008, 02:55pm /  #
mga [fog] is quite difficult for many foreign speakers :)

Wyspianska   Feb 2, 2008, 02:57pm /  #
boaah. For me it's enough when foreigner can say my name and maybe:
jeste ostra
hehe :P

Davey   Feb 2, 2008, 02:57pm /  #
zy is hard for some people too

paczka   Feb 2, 2008, 06:22pm /  #
dz lol

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