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misleading differences between Polish and English languages


panienka   Mar 14, 2008, 02:54pm /  #
When English says absolutely it means yes
When Polish says absolutnie it means no
When English says actually it means in fact
When Polish says aktualnie it means currently
When English says accurate it means precise
When Polish says akurat it means no,you are wrong
When English says ordinary it means usual
When Polish says ordynarny it means rude,unkind
When English says curve it means bend
When Polish says kurwa it means....
Why it's so misleading


tornado2007   Mar 14, 2008, 02:56pm /  #
panienka wrote:

When English says absolutely it means yes
When Polish says absolutnie it means no
When English says actually it means in fact
When Polish says aktualnie it means currently
When English says accurate it means precise
When Polish says akurat it means no,you are wrong
When English says ordinary it means usual
When Polish says ordynarny it means rude,unkind
When English says curve it means bend
When Polish says kurwa it means....
Why it's so misleading


what are you basing this on Panienka??? with respect you haven't been to england, lol :)

Vincent Moderator   Mar 14, 2008, 04:03pm /  #
That is very interesting Panienka...do you know of any more?

tornado2007   Mar 14, 2008, 04:17pm /  #
Ow right i see, what you mean, reading over them again i have noticed, lol. i can even finish this off for you, lol, kurwa is whore :) Before i didn't have a clue what it represented, i thought it was the same word written twice like in English then two different meanings,

a little like when men say yes it means yes and when women say yes it means maybe :)

there must be more of these, i wonder it its in Polish only!!

panienka   Mar 15, 2008, 04:08am /  #
Vincent wrote:
do you know of any more?


combine - join
kombinować - contrive

Dublinjohn   Mar 15, 2008, 04:42am /  #
Ok in English means middle, neither good nor bad
Ok in Polish means good
my favorite though, is in Polish when "No" means yes

JustysiaS   Mar 15, 2008, 04:47am /  #
i remembered about one that sounds exactly the same both in English and Polish but it means something completely different...

whistle and łysol (a bald man)

szarlotka Edited by: szarlotka    Mar 15, 2008, 05:03am /  #
Brat is Polish for brother (I think), in English it's used to describe a nasty little spoilt child.

In my brother's case he used to fit both well

MareGaea Edited by: MareGaea    Mar 15, 2008, 07:19am /  #
panienka wrote:
Why it's so misleading


It's not misleading, that would imply that the evolution of languages had the sole purpose of deceiving you. It's just due to the fact that they are totally different languages, not even part of the same family. I myself wonder while learning Polish why there is absolutely no recognisable word (except the load-words) in Polish.

M-G (it's all one big set-up!)

Edit: the part of the not recognisable words is not entirely true, I just figured. When I try to learn Polish with my own native language, Dutch, as basis, I find that there ARE some recognisable words: one simple example is Szukaj, the Polish word for search. In Dutch that would be Zoek. The combination oe is in Dutch pronounced like a Polish U. With a little imagination you can figure out what Szukaj means without using a dictionairy.

osiol   Mar 15, 2008, 07:34am /  #
Who, you? - sounds like an innocent question in English, but like a nasty insult in Polish
Cheaper may mean less expensive in English, but in Polish, again, you might sound like you're saying something slightly rude.
Słoń is elephant, not swan. Nothing rude about that.

panienka wrote:
combine - join
kombinować - contrive

C'est combien - how much is that? - French!

panienka   Mar 15, 2008, 11:57am /  #
i remember also:
capture - seize
kaptur - hood

z_darius   Mar 17, 2008, 08:19am /  #
panienka wrote:
wrote:
combine - join
kombinować - contrive


actually, kombinować as contrive is of secondary or tertiary meaning. Kombinowac primarilly has exactly the same meaning as English combine i.e. ł±czyć różne elementy w okre¶lon± cało¶ć. In both languages the word is of Latin origin.

panienka wrote:
When Polish says akurat it means no,you are wrong

I dunno. It MAY mean that, but this is not the primary meaning of the word. Kinda like English "yeah, right".

Back to misleading ones:

Polish kant
English cunt

Polish PiS
English piss (these actually seem to be synonyms at times)

Polish mak
English muck

JustysiaS   Mar 17, 2008, 01:44pm /  #
pet in English is a dog or a cat or a hamster, or any animal you keep in the house
pet in Polish is a fag

Gary is an English/American name
gary in Polish is saucepans or pots ;)

panienka   Mar 17, 2008, 01:56pm /  #
right JustysiaS, in fact i didn't realise hehe

tornado2007   Mar 17, 2008, 02:02pm /  #
z_darius wrote:

Polish kant
English cunt

Polish PiS
English piss (these actually seem to be synonyms at times)

Polish mak
English muck

i totally get where your coming from there :)

JustysiaS wrote:

Gary is an English/American name
gary in Polish is saucepans or pots ;)

lol, a name that means something in another language

osiol   Mar 17, 2008, 02:33pm /  #
z_darius wrote:
Polish kant
English cunt

You're not really going to mistake these two either in writing or orally.

JustysiaS wrote:
gary in Polish is saucepans or pots

To pot (verb: to put plants in pots)
Pot - Polish for sweat / perspire.

- Osiol (bringing a bit of horticulture to the forum, again and again and again and again)

panienka Edited by: panienka    Mar 17, 2008, 02:41pm /  #
osiol wrote:
- Osiol

hmm, by the way i think pronunciation of donkey is similar to Polish domki (small houses) ;)

osiol   Mar 17, 2008, 03:08pm /  #
panienka wrote:
i think pronunciation of donkey is similar to Polish domki

That may be better than it being likened to the word 'b±ki'.

z_darius   Mar 17, 2008, 09:08pm /  #
osiol wrote:
That may be better than it being likened to the word 'b±ki'.

bonk - b±k

plk123   Mar 17, 2008, 11:11pm /  #
ham (hog'a rump) - ham (an @s$hole-person)


but why is it misleading? hmm.. these are totaly different languages and really none of these words sound the same.. similar, sure but not the same. practice your pronunciation. the meanings are completely different too. hmm..

panienka Edited by: panienka    Mar 18, 2008, 08:57am /  #
plk123 wrote:
but why is it misleading?

because when i was learning English i was sure actually means aktualnie etc. , it might be a bit helpful for some people :)

tornado2007   Mar 18, 2008, 11:48am /  #
z_darius wrote:

bonk - b±k

lol, thought Bak, was a polish centre back, and yes the commentators do pronounce it bonk!!

panienka wrote:
but why is it misleading?

because when i was learning English i was sure actually means aktualnie etc. , it might be a bit helpful for some people :)

i wondered the same thing too, i learnt French at school and there not that many misleading words that were both very similar but meant two totally different things in both English/|French. Although i guess i've never thought of it like you have. Maybe its just an english/polish thing, lol, a secret mesaage!!

Marek   Mar 18, 2008, 01:40pm /  #
In English 'No' means 'Nie', in Polish 'No' means 'Well?', 'So, uh..' e.g. 'No, co słychać?' = So, what's up?

polishgirltx   Mar 18, 2008, 01:43pm /  #
Marek wrote:
'No' means 'Well?'

'no' does not means 'well'.... it means 'yes'.... but: 'No to co slychac?' = "So, what's up?'

z_darius   Mar 18, 2008, 01:47pm /  #
polishgirltx wrote:

'no' does not means 'well'.


Marek is right. "no" has more meanings than just "yes".

polishgirltx   Mar 18, 2008, 01:50pm /  #
z_darius wrote:
"no" has more meanings than just "yes".


ok...could you give me a few more examples?

panienka   Mar 18, 2008, 01:52pm /  #
i think z_darius is right, we can say "no nie wiem..." etc. :)

polishgirltx   Mar 18, 2008, 01:56pm /  #
yes....i checked.... 'no' itself means yes or well... but when combined with other words, means different stuff.... you're right guys

z_darius   Mar 18, 2008, 01:57pm /  #
polishgirltx wrote:
ok...could you give me a few more examples?


No tak (it doesn't mean "yes yes")
No... siadaj (well, sit down)
No i co ja mu powiem? (and what am I going to tell him?)
No i sie spierdolilo (and so it got fvucked up)

polishgirltx   Mar 18, 2008, 01:58pm /  #
thanks z_d....

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