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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

marqoz Threads: -
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  ♂   Edited by: marqoz  Mar 2, 2010, 12:02pm  #

gmc:
Lockaschun

Maybe it was Łukaszun:
I've found in google: Augustyn Łukaszun in matrimonial and death certificates for St. John's parish in Wilno in 1876: http://www.stankiewicze.com/index.php?kat=41&sub=615 and Anna Łukaszun: http://www.stankiewicze.com/index.php?kat=41&sub=623

Google knows!

And you have 70 people who have this family name in Poland now:
http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/łukaszun.html. They dispersed after WW2, but probably all were from Wilno and its surroundings. The name is probably of Lithuanian origin...
or even Latvian: Lukaąunas



niedzwiedz Threads: -
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  ♂   Mar 4, 2010, 06:29am  #

Hello, I am wondering if the name Dzarnowski is researchable. I have not found anything yet. If the name does mean something, I will seriously consider paying for a more in depth explanation.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 4, 2010, 08:50am  #

DŻARNOWSKI/DZIARNOWSKI: arhcaic root-word dziarno (variant forms: dżarno, dziarń, drz±stwo, etc.) = kind of fine gravel; or archaic adj. dziarny (hard-working). Several hundred bearers of Dziarnowski spelling in Poland.

HPurdum Threads: -
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  ♀   Mar 5, 2010, 02:42am  #

Can you possibly give me any information of the surname "Laniewski" means and what region of Poland it may be assoiciated with? Any help would be greatly appriaciated. Thanks.

marqoz Threads: -
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  ♂   Mar 5, 2010, 02:22pm  #

HPurdum:
"Laniewski"

It could be Łaniewski [waa-nyef-skee]. There is 370 men and 429 women with this last name in Poland now:
http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/łaniewski.html.

The name could be a toponymic one from village name Łaniewo, Łanowo, Łania.
The village name could be from either łan or łania:
Łan - measure of area used in agriculture until XIX century, equaled 18-24 ha
Łania - a hind

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 5, 2010, 05:30pm  #

There were 4 noble lines amongst the Łaniewskis, entitled to use: Korczak, Wieże, Odrow±ż and Znin c-o-a (the latter quite obscure). Mazowsze appears to be the main Łaniewski stronghold, esp. Greater Warsaw as well as the Ciechanów and Płock areas. But there are scattered clusters in and around Białystok, Olsztyn, ŁódĽ, Sieradz, Bydgoszcz, Gdańsk, Szczecin and Zielona Góra.

Snozzle of Oz     Mar 7, 2010, 04:22pm  #

Polonius, can you help me please? My great, great grandmother's surname was Kobelke, nee Kauschke, family from Bunzlau (Boleslavia) post-1945 and pre-12th century Bolesławiec, on the Bober (Bobr) river. Yes, my ancestors considered themselves German however, look at their surnames, which hint of a Slavic origin! They migrated to Australia in around 1840 due to religious persecution, but I would now like to know a little about this hidden aspect of their German names...that there is a Slavic or Polish aspect to consider. Can you tell me anything please? For example what meaning could the names have, and do Polish people have similar names?

Wydma1 Threads: 1
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  ♀   Mar 7, 2010, 08:05pm  #

Polonius3:
Wydmański: toponymic nick from Wydma (Dunes, Duneville)
Adamu¶iak: patronymic nick from pet form fo Adam - Adamu¶
Plewczyński: probably toponymic nick from Plewki or the Masurian-pronoucned Plewcewice (Chaffsonville)

BTW thanks. Any ideas as to where to search for more information on exact origins?

lide Threads: -
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Joined: Mar 8, 2010
  ♀   Mar 8, 2010, 01:53am  #

Hello, don’t know if this is the right forum but at least you might be able to point me in right direction.

To start with – my maiden name is KLUT – have you ever heard of such surname in Poland. From the look of it is not a typical polish name, wonder where it originated.

The rest of my ancestor have a “typical” polish names as well – LAFERY, SCHOUNBAUM (that should be a German O with double comas on top of it) and, finally, which is puzzling me the most, on my grandparents marriage certificate there is a name of my grandmother’s mother simply put as TEKLA from TRASZKÓW (Tekla z Trzasków) so she does not even have a surname as such. The certificate was issued in 1932 in Warsaw, so I presume that they all were living in or around Warsaw in the early 1900’s

Any help appreciated

Thanks in advance

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 8, 2010, 08:33am  #

The best are the works of the late Kazimierz Rymut (in Polish only).

Czarnkow1940 Threads: 8
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  ♂   Mar 8, 2010, 08:40am  #

hi does anyone know origin and meaning of "Larecki" thanks to anyone that can help :)

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 8, 2010, 08:50am  #

KLUT: possibly from the archaic Polish word kluta (a sloven) - 10 bearers in today's Poland
LAFERY: possible derivation - the archaic word lafa (borrowed from Turkish) meaning annual army pay
SCHÖNBAUM: German for beautiful tree
TEKLA z TRZASKOWA: Centuries ago such names were common amongst the nobiltiy; eventually Andzrej z Czajkowa evolved into Andrzej Czajkowski zust as in English Egbert of Stanford became simply Egbert Stanford. If the ceritifate was issued in the 1930s, presmably the surname was missing, hence only the native locality (Trzasków) got recorded.

AdamKadmon     Mar 8, 2010, 10:25am  #

Larecki - od imienia Hilary. Imię notowane w Polsce od pocz±tku XIII wieku, w staropolszczyĽnie: Hilarzy 1397, Ilarzy 1388. Jest pochodzenia łacińskiego, od przymiotnika hilarius ‘wesoły, pogodny’.

Według portalu moikrewni.pl w Polsce jest 61 osób o nazwisku Larecki. Zamieszkuj± oni w 17 różnych powiatach i miastach. Najwięcej zameldowanych jest w Włoszczowa ,a dokładnie 13.

Czarnkow1940 Threads: 8
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  ♂   Mar 8, 2010, 10:38am  #

AdamKadmon:
arecki - od imienia Hilary. Imię notowane w Polsce od pocz±tku XIII wieku, w staropolszczyĽnie: Hilarzy 1397, Ilarzy 1388. Jest pochodzenia łacińskiego, od przymiotnika hilarius ‘wesoły, pogodny’.

Według portalu moikrewni.pl w Polsce jest 61 osób o nazwisku Larecki. Zamieszkuj± oni w 17 różnych powiatach i miastach. Najwięcej zameldowanych jest w Włoszczowa ,a dokładnie 13.

Thank you very much :) May I ask where you found this and could you provide me with a link if possible.

AdamKadmon     Mar 8, 2010, 11:13am  #

Due to the Anti-Spam Protection I cannot put the address.
So before '://preview.tinyurl.com/ycgzsny' put 'http', removing beforehand quatation-marks. Then find your surname on a long list.

marqoz Threads: -
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  ♂   Mar 8, 2010, 11:33pm  #

lide:
TEKLA from TRASZKÓW (Tekla z Trzasków) so she does not even have a surname as such.

Polonius generally is right but in this case I think that it's just a maiden family name of the wife. It was common practice to put maiden name when the family name is known from context.
So you could find in documents for example: Jan Schoenbaum i Tekla z Trzasków what means exactly: Jan Schoenbaum and Tekla Schoenbaum from family Trzaska.

Preposition "z" is shortened from "z domu" sometimes in latin "de domo" meaning "from house of".

There were many family names of German origin in Poland. Some of them were used by great Polish patriots and researchers like: Aleksander Brueckner (greatest Polish etymologist), Bogusław Linde (author of the first modern dictionary of Polish language), Krzysztof Szembek (primate of Poland), Emilia Plater (Polish woman-commander of the November Uprising in Lithuania).

marqoz Threads: -
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  ♂   Mar 9, 2010, 12:50am  #

Snozzle of Oz:
Kobelke, nee Kauschke, family from Bunzlau (Boleslavia) post-1945 and pre-12th century Bolesławiec, on the Bober (Bobr) river. Yes, my ancestors considered themselves German however, look at their surnames, which hint of a Slavic origin! They migrated to Australia in around 1840 due to religious persecution

Maybe I, since Polonius not responded earlier ;-)

KOBELKE looks like germanized Polish KOBYŁKA meaning small mare or in plural KOBYŁKI also grasshopper or locust.

KAUSCHKE looks also like germanized Polish or wider Slavonic diminutive. But it's not as obvious as the former. Diphthong AU could be equivalent of Slavonic U, so the original word could have sounded like KUSZKA or KU¦KA.
KUSZKA according to Samuel Bogumił Linde (1808) could mean:
1. a small box to hold sharpening stone (whetstone) to sharpen a blade (chine) of a scythe, it used to be bound to a mower's belt (description in German: ein hohler Zapfen mit Wasser, worin die Maeher den Senfenstein am Guertel haengen haben)
2. a small crossbow.
KU¦KA used to mean: 3. a penis ;-)
So, having in mind that your ancestors were most probably of peasant origin the most plausible etymology is whetstone holder not a knightly crossbow and not an obscene moniker as well.

The environment of Boleslauez later Bunzlau was gradually germanized from XIII to XVI century. But your ancestors could came from another part of Silesia.

Your line about religious persecution in 1840, which made your ancestors fled, interested me much. What was it all about? What was their denomination?

gmc     Mar 9, 2010, 02:40pm  #

OMGOSH Thank you so much!! I will look into it. I am so glad I remembered to check back here so my emai is Aceg1402@aol.com

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 9, 2010, 02:49pm  #

Indeed, Tekla z Trzasków would be Tekla née Trzaska, esp. that being the 1930s. In 1597, it might have been Tekla z Trzaskowa likely to eventually evovle into Tekla Trzaskowska.

frasier90 Threads: -
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  ♂   Mar 9, 2010, 09:44pm  #

Anybody know what Debiak means and where it comes from please? I can't find anything on my last name. It'd be most appreciated.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 9, 2010, 11:55pm  #

CORRECTING TYPO: Klimczyk = Clemson

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 10, 2010, 11:41am  #

DĘBIAK: probably topo nikc from Dęba, Dębie, Dębe (Oaks, Oakton, Oakly, Oakville) or one of the many other localtieis incorporating the "dęb-" root.

cbear     Mar 10, 2010, 10:51pm  #

the meaning of Dekoski?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 11, 2010, 12:04am  #

DEKOWSKI: topo nick for an inhabitant of Deka in Pomerania

Darun Threads: 1
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  ♂   Mar 11, 2010, 08:21am  #

Can someone please tell me the meaning of the name Daszkiewicz? Thank you.

AdamKadmon     Mar 11, 2010, 11:26am  #

Daszkiewicz - 1405 od imion na Da-, typu Dalebor, Daniel, Dawid.

Galicia1     Mar 11, 2010, 07:56pm  #

marqoz:
ŻYBCZYŃSKI is more problematic but could be changed form of ŻABCZYŃSKI: from FROG

Zybczynski was not changed, several individuals with that surname currently reside in Poland, and my American branch left in the early 1900's.

Zby prefix of of towns are quite common, however, they are not related.

Researched back to post Austrian-Poland partition, Little Poland (Malopolska) region, Krakow region in general.

Not a common spelling, but that is how it is spelled none the less.

KristenMH Threads: 2
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  ♀   Mar 12, 2010, 03:34am  #

How about the surname Lucka? I've never found any information about the origin of this name other than that it originates from the name Luke.

My ancestor came from Tarnow, Poland.

Many thanks,

Kristen

Polonius3 Threads: 1,224
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  ♂   Mar 12, 2010, 01:19pm  #

ŁUCKA: looks to be the fem. form of Łucki, a topo nick for an inhabitant of the city of Łuck or environs. Since so many things have happened to names over the ages, teh Christian name Łukasz cannot be ruled out as a source, and Łucjan seems even more plausible.

marqoz Threads: -
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  ♂   Mar 12, 2010, 03:25pm  #

Galicia1:
Zybczynski was not changed, several individuals with that surname currently reside in Poland, and my American branch left in the early 1900's.

Maybe it was Zbyczyński - http://www.moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/zbyczyński.html, which are now present in Southern Varmia.



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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

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