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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?


Harry Threads: 53 / Posts: 10,992
♂ Joined: May 2, 2007
  Mar 25, 2010, 11:48am  #871

Camille:
Also His mothers name looks like Katarzyma or Katurzyma

Neither. It's Katarzyna.
Camille Threads: - / Posts: 1
♀ Joined: Mar 25, 2010
  Mar 25, 2010, 12:01pm  #872

I found a website that helped

yes I did put an m where it is an n typo error
It is Katarzyna thanks

and I say that what looked like Ev is actually a W
hard to read handwriting
so name is Wojciach the website spelled it Wojciech
it also means Albert

How do you pronounce these names?
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Mar 25, 2010, 04:16pm  #873

VOY-chekh (ch sound as in Scottish loch at end)

kah-tah-ZHI-nah
WARCZAKOSKI Threads: - / Posts: 1
♂ Joined: Mar 27, 2010
  Mar 27, 2010, 04:58pm  #874

WARCZAKOSKI
SeanBM Threads: 35 / Posts: 5,962
♂ Joined: Mar 10, 2008
  Mar 28, 2010, 11:40am  #875

It is possible that the person with this surname originally came from Warcza
mapy.eholiday.pl/mapa-warcz-trabki_wielkie-pruszcz_gdanski.html
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Mar 30, 2010, 03:34pm  #876

WARCZAKOSKI:
WARCZAKOSKI

Warczak could have hailed from Warcza and his son could have become Warzakowski.
Or maybe, Warczak was a nickname for someone who constantly growled at people (warczeć=to growl). But his son would have been dubbed Warczakowski all the same.
KristenMH Threads: 2 / Posts: 15
♀ Joined: Mar 12, 2010
  Apr 1, 2010, 03:11am  #877

Here's an interesting one for you (or at least I think so):

My ancestor's name is John Lucka. He came to the US under the name Jan Lucki. On his St. Albans manifest, his father is listed as Lucka Wawrzyniac. Any idea why he would use his father's first name as his last name?

I haven't found his Canadian manifest yet, so I don't know if he arrived in Canada under Lucki or Wawrzyniac.

Many thanks as usual!

Kristen
musicwriter Threads: 5 / Posts: 98
♂ Joined: Jan 7, 2010
  Apr 1, 2010, 04:44am  #878

That explanation sounds quite plausible. There were many Lewandowski's that immigrated to Toledo, Ohio from 1870 to 1890. Most Poles that settled in Toledo came from that area, especially from the villages near Żnin. My grandfather (Drzewiecki) was from Wenecja and was conscripted into the Prussian Army in 1885 and served until 1888. I have his military papers that he carried with him which is written in German and stamped with the official seal of the Prussian Empire.
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 1, 2010, 06:20am  #879

Lucka or Łucka may have been pet versions of Lucyna (Lucille) or Łucja (Lucy). Wawrzyniac does'nt sound right, and no-one in today's Poland uses that spelling. There are a number of people surnamed Wawrzyniec (Lawrence). Could be that the document, if hand-written in that fancy European script, was misread, the e appearing to be an a.
KristenMH Threads: 2 / Posts: 15
♀ Joined: Mar 12, 2010
  Apr 2, 2010, 08:43pm  #880

I think you're right. I looked at the original manifest, and it's an "e." Also, it was written last name first (Lucka, Wawrzyniec).

Thank you!
RLubas   Apr 3, 2010, 07:59pm  #881

Hey, if you find any information about the name lubaszewski please let me know. I am really starting to get into my heritage and am interested if anyone has any information.

Thanks,
Robert T. Lubaszewski Jr.
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 3, 2010, 10:56pm  #882

LUBASZEWSKI: more likely than not originated as a topo nick for someone from Lubasz, Lubaszew or Lubaszewo. The 'lub-' root indicates love, affection, liking, etc. hence Lovington, Loveville...
kazalina Threads: 9 / Posts: 12
♀ Joined: Dec 28, 2009
  Apr 4, 2010, 06:10pm  #883

I am looking for any information on the the following last names;

Najwert

Razna

Radowska

Any information would be very helpful, thank you.
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 4, 2010, 09:23pm  #884

NAJWERT: polonised version of German surnames Neiwert or Neuwert

RAŹNY: now archaic adj. meaning timely, beneficial, lively, spritly

RADOWSKI: topo nick from Radowo or Radów (Counselton, Gladbury)
D. Bud   Apr 5, 2010, 05:30pm  #885

my name was legally shortened to this but i dont know what it used to be before but i know its polish...its Budfuloski. Any ideas?

The spelling was changed in 1909 from Butvilofski
quatla   Apr 6, 2010, 05:52am  #886

what does lontkowski mean?
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 6, 2010, 08:53am  #887

BUTWIŁOWSKI(?): The closest surnames used in Poland is Butwiłowski; others include Butwił, Butwiłło, Butwiło and Butwiłowicz and. The –owski ending usually indicates a topo nick; possible root-word butwieć=to rot, mildew; butwiałka refers to a piece of rotting wood that has fallen off a tree.

LONTKOWSKI: possible root-word lont (fuse – originally from German loan-word Lunte);
or topo nick from Łądek, misspelt or phoneticcally re-spelt.
Randal Threads: 1 / Posts: 599
♂ Joined: Feb 14, 2009
  Apr 7, 2010, 05:53am  #888

I have two I’d like to know the meaning of:

BIENKOWSKI
WOJTAL

Thanks, P3!
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 7, 2010, 02:27pm  #889

BIEŃKOWSKI: root-wiord Benedykt (hypocoristic form Bieniek); topo nick from Bieńki, Bieńków or similar (Bennyville)

WOJTAL: one of many derivatives from either the first name Wojciech/Wojtek or the word wójt (village mayor)
Randal Threads: 1 / Posts: 599
♂ Joined: Feb 14, 2009
  Apr 7, 2010, 09:24pm  #890

Thank you, P3, you are indeed a wealth of information. But now I have further questions…

Do I recall seeing somewhere that there was a Polish mayor or president or pope or something with a name very similar to “WOJTAL”? I know I’ve see mention of it somewhere around PF but I can’t find the thread just now.

And what does “topo nick” mean? I don’t understand this abbreviation.

Also, what does this mean?:
Polonius3:
The –owski ending usually indicates a topo nick

I know you’ve explained the meaning of “-owski” before, but if you could again…
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 7, 2010, 11:29pm  #891

A toponymic nickname is oen based on someone's palce of residence. Eglish does this to a limited degree (Londoner,Chicagoan, Bostonian, etc.), but Polish extends this to even the smallest hamlets.
So Józef Bieńkowski would mean the Józef from Bieńki or Bieńków.
Rugby12   Apr 8, 2010, 03:37pm  #892

What does "Dowgiewicz" mean if anything?
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 8, 2010, 06:44pm  #893

DOWGIEWICZ: the one certain thing here is that this is a patronymic nickname, indicating the son of someone. That someone may be Dowgird, the Polish version of the Lithuanian name Daugirdas. The "daug" syllable in Lithuanian means "much" and "gird" has to do with hearing, so Daugirdas may have originally meant something like "all-hearing". But my knowledge of Lithuanian is limited, so maybe someone else will have a better explanation.
Michael1   Apr 10, 2010, 01:23pm  #894

My last name is Stapor, and I've seen it spelled 'Stąpor' if I dig around on the internet too. I'm just wondering what this means, because I can't find anything about the name.
c3p0 Threads: 1 / Posts: 11
♂ Joined: Mar 19, 2010
  Apr 10, 2010, 05:42pm  #895

a girl that I like really much got the last name: Kaczocha
A Fan Threads: - / Posts: 2
♂ Joined: Apr 10, 2010
  Apr 10, 2010, 09:24pm  #896

Good Evening Friends, Do you have any knowledge of the Surname Makiela?

Many thanks.
mtngal67   Apr 11, 2010, 05:51am  #897

I came across this forum while trying to look up information on my Great Grandfather who came to America in 1906 through Ellis Island. I'm curious what the last name Grela or Grella means.

Thank you for any information!
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 11, 2010, 10:55pm  #898

STĄPOR: crushing tool (pestle used in a mortar or a log for crushing grain in a trough)

GRELA: a type of peat or an old peasant game using wooden clubs which are called grele; possibly also a pet name for Grzegorz.

MAKIELA: from makielki, a sweet dish served on Wigilia containing poppyseed, nuts, fruit, bread, milk and honey

KACZOCHA: an augmentative form of kaczka (duck); the diminutive kaczuszka means a cute, little duckling whilst kaczocha or kaczysko suggests a big, old, mangy duck.
colie0110   Apr 12, 2010, 04:45pm  #899

Tousky? Was told this is a variation on the original spelling (unkown) making it very difficult to trace roots.
Polonius3 Threads: 873 / Posts: 6,367
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 12, 2010, 05:26pm  #900

No Tousky or Touski in Poland. The ou combination is rare in Polish and appears only in the following T-starting surnames: Toubert Toubor Toufar Toulas Touma Tounsi Tousciuk Toussaint Tousta Toustochowicz Tousty Touszek Touścik Touściuk. Could it have been Towalewski or Towalski?


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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

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