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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?


Plusa10 Activity: 3 / 23
Joined: 22 May 2010 ♀
 
24 May 2010  #871

sorry I haven't looked through all pages of this thread yet...
grandparent's last name was Laskowski... any meaning?
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
24 May 2010  #872

LASKOWSKI: basic root - las (forest), specifically its derivative lasek (wood, grove) or lasak (forest-dweller). However, nearly all surnames ending in -owski are of toponymic origin hence the actual source was most likely one of several localities named Lasków, Laskowo or Laskowszczyzna (Forestville, Woodbury, Groveton).
nincompoop_not Activity: 2 / 192
Joined: 3 Nov 2009 ♀
 
24 May 2010  #873

Could also derived from LASKOWY, as in orzech laskowy (hazelnut).
Plusa10 Activity: 3 / 23
Joined: 22 May 2010 ♀
 
24 May 2010  #874

thank you both.
HelloKitty Activity: - / 1
Joined: 25 May 2010 ♀
 
25 May 2010  #875

Louise,

My grandfather's name was Stanislaus Kostka Gapa, and he traveled from Dembno? Poland/Germany? in 1912 - I have copies of his shipping papers, and his picture. I think he came in through Philadelphia, not sure.

He married Mary (Mittie) Lee Dewveall (Duvall later on)(from Texas) in 1917 and somehow they ended up in Kansas. Unfortunately he died at 50 leaving my grandmother with nine kids! My mom (Elizabeth) was seven of nine, my uncle John being the ninth and a baby at the time.

So when he died in 1939,(heart attack walking home from work as a printer/laborer), I think six or seven went to an orphanage, the older ones already out of school and/or on their own. My mom was eight, so she didn't have much of a childhood.

I so want to find out more about my mom's side of the family. I have no information about his family, siblings, etc. And I also think that Gapa was shortened, you don't see many four-letter Polish surnames! I do know that he lived in Wisconsin for about a year, and how he ended up in Kansas is unknown.

Let me know if you know anything on your end about the Gapa name - it is unusually short, so it will be interesting to dig. I also live near a Mormon "library" that has thousands of names on file, so I can go there or sign up online and see what they have.

Thanks, and I look forward to hearing from you!
Plusa10 Activity: 3 / 23
Joined: 22 May 2010 ♀
 
25 May 2010  #876

on the topic of shortened last names...one guitarist in my favorite band, he's
Polish but his last name--Gers--is unusually short for a Polish last name...what could the full last name possibly be?
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
25 May 2010  #877

GERS: Possibly Gerasimowicz - Polish version of Ukrainian Harasymowycz (son of Harasym)

GAPA: gawking ninny, booby; also another name for a crow (normal name: wrona)

WASILEWSKI: topo nick from Wasilewo (Basilton); Wasyl and Wasil are eastern (Ruthenian) forms of the first name Bazyli (Basil)

SEGAL: Hebrew name meaning member of the Levite tribe.
smartie  
26 May 2010  #878

Thread attached on merging:
Surname Lendzion

If you could give me the meaning or any other information about the surname of Lendzion.

Thank you
plk123 Activity: 11 / 4,276
Joined: 29 Aug 2007 ♂
 
26 May 2010  #879

no meaning..it may not even be polish
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
26 May 2010  #880

WOJACKI: It could also have originated as a toponymic nickname for someone from Wojakowa (Warriorville) in south Poland's Małołopolska region. Wojakowski would have been more logical from a linguisitc standpoint, but the original nickanmers were not linguists but usually ordinary, illiterate peasants who twisted things around and blurted out whatever came to mind with no regards for etymology or grammar. The idela match would have been a place called Wojak or Wojaki.
starman Activity: - / 1
Joined: 26 May 2010 ♂
 
26 May 2010  #881

Can someone tell me what my surname Krzyszkowski means, I understand it is uncommon even in Poland.
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
26 May 2010  #882

KRZYSZKOWSKI: topo nick from Krzyszkowo (root probably Krzysztof, hence something like Chrisville. Not too rare - well over1,000 users in Poland.

ŻARCZYŃSKI: is used in Poland, Rzarczyński is not. Topo nick from Żarczyn (Ardourville, Glowbury).

KOWALCZYK: occupational patronymic nick = blacksmith's son or helper

ZAKRZEWSKI: topo nick from Zakrzewo (Overbush, Shrubton)
diane_pdx  
28 May 2010  #883

Thanks very much for the help.
sanadoon  
29 May 2010  #884

The Polish side of my family has two surnames I am interested in: KROLIK and PALUCH.

Re KROLIK: All immigrated to Wisconsin and Chicago in late 1800's, arriving in Baltimore from Bremen.My grandfather was John James Krolik (Catholic), his father was Ignacz Krolik (Catholic), and his father was Jacob Krolik. All came from "Prussia."
One member of our family feels our Polish ancestors were Jewish. Others in our family do not agree. I know the name Krolik is used by both Jews and Catholics, but am wondering if most Polish Kroliks are Catholic or Jewish.
Jacob Krolik (born about 1830) married Mary Paluch.

Re PALUCH: Is Paluch a Jewish or Catholic name?

Don't get me wrong. I really don't care if my Polish ancestors were Jewish or Catholic; I would simply like to know.

My personal feeling, based on limited research, is that they were always Catholic.

Turk Thomas Humphrey
Queensland, Australia
Allison Activity: 6 / 112
Joined: 29 May 2010 ♀
 
29 May 2010  #885

The meaning of my Polish ancestor's last name; Paprocki means fern. Does anyone know the probable region that would eventually end up in? It seems pommeranian to me. Also is this a very common name for Poles to have? I believe it is.
POLENGGGs Activity: 2 / 151
Joined: 26 Apr 2010 ♂
 
29 May 2010  #886

The Polish side of my family has two surnames I am interested in: KROLIK and PALUCH.

They are both Polish surnames. If they were Jewish they probably would have changed it to Bremen =]
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
29 May 2010  #887

KRÓLIK: rabbit; typcial peasant name

PALUCH: big finger; typical descriptive nick, also typcilaly peasant

NOTE: The above contain no religious connotation; their bearers could be anything.

TARASIEWICZ: Patronymic nick from Ukrainian popular first name Taras, hence son of Taras.
joncbaby  
2 Jun 2010  #888

CAN YOU PLEASE TELL ME WHERE CWIERDZINSKI originates from????
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
2 Jun 2010  #889

ĆWIERDZIŃSKI: The basic root-word is ćwierdz or ćwierdza, archaic for twierdza (fortress, dungeon).
lrk138 Activity: - / 1
Joined: 2 Jun 2010 ♀
 
2 Jun 2010  #890

Keyowski
in24935  
2 Jun 2010  #891

What about Ziolkowski?
Wlazlo Activity: - / 4
Joined: 12 Mar 2010 ♂
 
2 Jun 2010  #892

Does anybody know what is behind my lastname "Wlazło" ?

My dad tells me that our ancestors were patriotic farmers, who lived south of the town Radom..
1jola Activity: 17 / 1,926
Joined: 23 Sep 2008 ♂
 
2 Jun 2010  #893

What about Ziolkowski?

Ziółkowski (original spelling) from Zioło, Ziółko which means HERBS. Perhaps associated with traditional medicine.
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
2 Jun 2010  #894

WLAZŁO: this is one of a group of names derived from past-tense verbs. They can be of any gender: Biegało (it was running), Przybył (he has arrived). Gwizdała (she was whistling). They originated to identify someone on the basis of his/her common trait and in English would have taken on such forms as Runner, Arriver and Whistler respectively.
Wlazło comes from the verb wleĽć (to crawl or creep into) and means it has crawled or crept. How and why such a nickname got attached to someone is anyone's guess.
1jola Activity: 17 / 1,926
Joined: 23 Sep 2008 ♂
 
2 Jun 2010  #895

the verb wleĽć (to crawl or creep into) and means it has crawled or crept.

It could also mean to climb. Perhaps someone with good climbing skills, Polonius?
Wlazlo Activity: - / 4
Joined: 12 Mar 2010 ♂
 
2 Jun 2010  #896

Well I don't hope that the name comes from some creepy guy !

Thanks though :-)
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
3 Jun 2010  #897

As in 'Wlazł kotek na płotek i mruga...' Yes, indeed, it can mean to climb a tree or even get up on a table or cupboard.

KEYOWSKI: No-on in Poland uses this name. Ii must have got respelt or misspelt somewhere along the line.

ZIÓŁKOWSKI: root-word ziółko (herb, weed); but -owski suggests a topo nick such as Ziółków or Ziółkowo as teh source.
mmijalski Activity: - / 1
Joined: 2 Jun 2010 ♂
 
3 Jun 2010  #898

Mijalski -passer-by?
soilderofwar Activity: - / 2
Joined: 27 Apr 2010 ♂
 
4 Jun 2010  #899

Please help, my last name is Shiminski and I have no idea what it means, no one has ever been able to tell me what it means and I've looked all over for the meaning!

Any help would be much appreciated, thanks!
Polonius3 Activity: 902 / 6,394
Joined: 11 Apr 2008 ♂
 
4 Jun 2010  #900

SIMIŃSKI: Variant form of Siemieński = either patronymic from Siemion (Russian for Szymon) or topo nick from Siemień, Siemiony. Shiminski is a phonetic respelling in English-speaking countries.



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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?
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