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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 1, 2010, 09:31pm  #1,021

I was only partly right, because I didn't think of Czech. The Czech ending for the masc. sing. adj. is indeed -ého, but the cz is Polish. In Czech it would read Folvarčného in the genitive and accusative case.


KristenMH Threads: 2
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  ♀   May 2, 2010, 03:16pm  #1,022

That's interesting. I took another look at the information, and this ancestor's grandparents are listed as Johann Folwarczného and Anny Kubeczkové (Kubeczkova?). Sounds like a combination of Polish and Czech?

When my ancestor was born, the city she was born in, Prostřední Suché (I've also seen Sucha Sredna), was in Austria-Hungary; today it's in the Czech Republic. Do you think these differences in spelling are the result of the differences in the Czech language?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 2, 2010, 05:35pm  #1,023

Most likely. Don't forget that the Slavic names got written down by non-Slavs at Ellis Islannand other ports of entry. That probably attests to the anomaly of the Polish cz in a Czech name instead of the Czech č. To America's Anglo and Irish im migration officials Slavic names probably looked like an unintelliglible jumble of consonants.

KristenMH Threads: 2
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  ♀   May 3, 2010, 01:56am  #1,024

I understand. I've done some further digging, and I've encountered two more names that I'd like to tell you about. One is Tabaj, and the other is Goral. I've also seen Rataj. Are these names Polish?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 3, 2010, 09:56am  #1,025

TABAJ: Possibly dervied from the Hebrew name Tobiasz. The a instead of an o in the first syllable may indicate a Belarussian pronunciation. Or a topo nick from some such locality as
Tabaszowa. The -aj is a common Polish ending, eg hultaj (good for nothing)

GÓRAL: highlander, dweller of a moutnain area; in Sielsia used to mean every non-Sielsian outsider, whether from the hills or Kashubia or Białystok...

KristenMH Threads: 2
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  ♀   May 3, 2010, 05:57pm  #1,026

That's very interesting. Thanks for sharing your knowledge. What do you think about Kubeczkova? There's also someone in the family by the name of Gałgonek.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   Edited by: Polonius3  May 3, 2010, 11:55pm  #1,027

KUBECZKOWA: Kubeczkova would be the wife of Kubeczek (literally little mug or cup).
Kubeček and Kubečkova would be the Czech equivalents. Your Kubeczkova is a kind of hybrid spelling.

GAŁGONEK: variant spelling of Gałganek (little rag, tatter) - perhaps a nick for a beggar or homeless soul wearing threadbare clothes or maybe a rag collector.

UNKA: probably the hypocoristic (endearing pet) form of Unisława, a rare first name used by on 12 ladies in all of Poland today. Although Unka is not used by anyone in today's Poland as a surname, there are 49 people named Unkiewicz - a patronymic nick meaning son of Unka.

JONKA: This surname is used by only 11 people in Poland today. It looks to be a short Polonised form of the Lithuanian-rooted surname Jonkaitis, dervied from Jonas (Lithuanian for John).

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 6, 2010, 10:09pm  #1,028

LESZKIEWICZ: patronymic nick = son of Leszek

ZALESKI: toponymic nick from Zalesie (Edgewood) or a topographic one for someone living on the other side of the forest

SZUMA: szuma, szumawa and szum all suggest the rustling of leaves, the sough of swaying tree-tops, murmur of rapidly flowing water or the swoosh of the sea. Could have origianated as a toponymic nick for someone from Szumanie or Szumowo.

SZUMSKI: patroynmic nick = son of Szuma.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 7, 2010, 08:51am  #1,029

ODYNIEC: the male of the wild boar; also a clan-name in Polish heraldry (there is an Odyniec coat of arms).

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 7, 2010, 02:32pm  #1,030

PRZYBYŁA: Also Przybył and Przybyło come form the verb przybyć (to arrive). It was often a nick for a newcomer to the village or, as we might say today, the new guy on the block.

revryry Threads: -
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  ♂   May 7, 2010, 02:54pm  #1,031

Would you be able to help me out with a few names? I only know the english spelling...

Bernat

Gembinski

Markowicz

paulie1     May 7, 2010, 11:07pm  #1,032

Sech is my mother's maiden name(last name) Is the some meaning of her last name

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   Edited by: Polonius3  May 7, 2010, 11:38pm  #1,033

SECH: It might be of non-Polish (eg German or Yiddish) origin. If of ethnic Polish origin, it could be related to the past tense verb sechł (he was drying off) which is pronounced exactly like sech (the final ł is silent). Or perhaps it arose as a topo nick from the village of Sechna in Małopolska.

BERNAT: Czech form of the German first name Bernhard or Bernard; the more Polish equivalent is Biernat but Bernat is also used as a surname in Poland.

GEMBIŃSKI/GĘBIŃSKI: root-word gęba - vulgar term for mouth or face (mug, yap, snout). Probably topo nick from Gębiny

MARKOWICZ: patronymic nick = Marcson, Marcuson (Mark's son).

ZESLAW Threads: -
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  ♂   May 8, 2010, 12:07pm  #1,034

zeslawski with a - onthe z
according to what you are saying the name is from zeslawice near krakow ?
i went there and there is notrace of our name. in the area of walkonwy dolne ,zelislawice
the name is quite common but spelt with a dot above the z i have asked many times why this is so but cannot get to find out where the name comes from
your help most welcome

praglowski09 Threads: -
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  ♂   May 8, 2010, 12:47pm  #1,035

Hello. What is the meaning of Praglowski? Thank you.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   Edited by: Polonius3  May 8, 2010, 09:00pm  #1,036

PRAGŁOWSKI: -owski names are geenrally topo nicks, so this would be a way of identifying someone from Pragłów or Pragłowo. Meaning of pragłow- root is obscure. (Sounds like pre-head or proto-head whatever that might mean?!)

ZESŁAWSKI: topo form Zesławice, a Kraków district. No dot (ż) over the z, btu it amy have got inadvertently added over the generations, maybe during the partitions. Zesławice means the place settled by the Zesław boys. Both Zesławski and Żesławski exist in todays Poland.

niterythm Threads: -
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  ♀   May 9, 2010, 06:21pm  #1,037

I am so lost with my family history, I need help. My family last name is "Auberzinski" I have half of my uncles that spell it "Auberzinsky" then I found a record of "Aubersinsky" and a record of "Aberzinski" and they are all relatives. I also found a record of "Rubersinsky" It is the same father mother and kids. I need help. I was told that the family name was shorted when coming to the states. They immigrated in 1892.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 9, 2010, 09:20pm  #1,038

Where the Auberzinskis of ethnic Polish nationality?

Banaszak     May 10, 2010, 05:31am  #1,039

Banaszak

soniag     May 10, 2010, 05:58am  #1,040

Thanks so much. Really helpful. I now use this knowledge in my Maori mihi. Sonia

MikeKwas     May 10, 2010, 06:44am  #1,041

Being a fist generation American I still feel deep ties to the lands of my parents and grandparents but unfortunatly I have not been able to find a meaning or translation for my surname Kwasniewicz. My brother once told me he spoke with my grandfather about our family history briefly before he passed away a few years ago and all he could remember is that our family had been blacksmiths or something of the sort. I would greatly appreciate any information anyone can share.
Mkwas343@UWSP.edu

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   Edited by: Polonius3  May 10, 2010, 07:54am  #1,042

KWAŚNIEWCZ: This is a surname of patronymic origin (the -wicz tells us that!). IT means son of Kwaśny (the sour guy). Was he called that because of his constant sour puss or maybe he hailed from Kwaśno or Kwaśniów (Sourville, Sourton)? The nickname probably emerged centuries before your grandparents were born and it is unlikely to be indciative of their occupations.

BANASZAK: patronymic from Banach, peasant form of the first name Benedykt, so it means Benny's boy.

MikeKwas     May 10, 2010, 11:44pm  #1,043

Thanks allot for the information. I realy do appreciate the insight to the origins of my surname. It is interests me that the meaning of the kwasny portion relates to "sour puss" as that niether my father nore my grandfather were particularly handsome in referance to deep frown lines along the sides of the mouth and down to the chin. I suppose I am a bit surprised at the accuracy of the depiction. Thanks again.

diane_pdx     May 11, 2010, 12:45am  #1,044

I have been researching an ancestor's surname Wikaryasz, but I'm having trouble finding much information on it. Any ideas what the meaning/origin is? Any help is appreciated.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 11, 2010, 12:55pm  #1,045

WIKARYASZ: root-word wikary (vicar - priest who assists the rector or pastor of a parish). The Wikaryasz surname has been registered in Poland but no-one uses it at this time. There are a few people named Wkiarusz and Wikarski. Probably arose to identify the bastard son of a local priest. Men fo the cloth also had their human weaknesses and failings.

stevewalas     May 11, 2010, 07:29pm  #1,046

hi i am a friend of steve and my last name is kluk and i was just wondering what the mean of that is? is it polish?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 11, 2010, 10:28pm  #1,047

KLUK: possibly derivative of kluka - a pole with a hook at the end of it for drawing water from a crane-type well, suspending a cookpot over a campfire, etc. or topo nick from Kluki or Klukowo.

Marian Lach Threads: -
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  ♂   May 12, 2010, 12:17am  #1,048

Mine is of Old Polish Language origin, word "Lach" or "Lech" and means "Pole" in old polish

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 13, 2010, 09:06am  #1,049

SOKOŁOWICZ: -wicz = patronymic; a nick for the son of someone called Sokół, either through some association with falcons or becuase he hailed from some such place as Sokołów (most likely).

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
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  ♂   May 14, 2010, 07:20pm  #1,050

KRZYSIK: probbaly origianted as a patronymic nick fiom Krzysztof (Christopher). But one cannot rule out a toponymic source such as Krzyszkowice or Krzyszkowo.



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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

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