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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?


Specjalista Threads: 2 / Posts: 43
♂ Joined: Jan 22, 2012
  Apr 21, 2012, 11:48pm  #2,821

What is the meaning of Pluskota?
pawian Threads: 136 / Posts: 7,366
♂ Joined: May 30, 2008
  Apr 22, 2012, 12:24am  #2,822

Splasher ?
colonel   Apr 22, 2012, 01:33am  #2,823

My family last names are Szulc and Olearczyk my family was from Sulejow which is from Lodz?
Specjalista Threads: 2 / Posts: 43
♂ Joined: Jan 22, 2012
  Apr 22, 2012, 11:50am  #2,824

pawian
Splasher?

How did you get that? :)

Ahhh I see... pluskać I was thinking more along the lines of: Plus-kot(a)
cyn   Apr 22, 2012, 12:02pm  #2,825

Can anyone tell me the meaning of Niderla? it is not a typical Polish last name but there are many of us in Poland, my grandparents and their grandparents were Polish but I can't work out its origin.
boletus Threads: 35 / Posts: 1,496
♂ Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  Apr 22, 2012, 02:41pm  #2,826

Niderla - from a German personal name "Niederle", this in turn from High German "Ni(e)derlein", and this from the compound name " Nitheri". stankiewicze.com/index.php?kat=44&sub=546

The fact that the word "Netherlands", "Nederland" in Dutch, is spelled "Niderlandy" in Polish may be or may be not a pure coincidence.

Either way: German and Dutch settlers had been coming to Poland for centuries.
Kew13   Apr 23, 2012, 11:57am  #2,827

Hi,

Just wondering if you can help, my grandfathers surname was Czornanycz, are you able to tell me a bit more about this name?

I understand the ycz is the part added on as 'son of' but how far back would this practice have taken place?

I'm struggling to find any other czornanycz families other than my own and wondered if czorna, czorn, czorney or czorny could be 'americanised' version of the same surname?

Thanks.
Polonius3 Threads: 870 / Posts: 6,373
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 23, 2012, 01:19pm  #2,828

CZORNANYCZ: This surname appears to be of Ukrainian origin, although the spelling is Polish. In Ukrainian it would have been written be Чорнанич, but all Cyrillic names get transliterated into languages using the Latin alphabet. My guess is that this name could have originated as a topo-patronymic nickname. Someone from one of several localities called Чорнa (Czorna) could have been dubbed Чорный, and the son he fathered might have been called Чорнанич. Anotehr option is that the father was called Чорный (Blackie), because of his dark complexion and raven hair, but his offspring could have been called Чорнанич all the same.
The fact that the name got transliterated into Czronanycz rather than Czornanicz (the Russian version) points to its Ukrainian origin.
Chorny and Chorney are quite likely English adaptations of the Russian/Ruthenian root “chorn-” indicating blackness.
Specjalista Threads: 2 / Posts: 43
♂ Joined: Jan 22, 2012
  Apr 23, 2012, 02:15pm  #2,829

I was wondering if you had anything for Pluskota?
Kew13   Apr 23, 2012, 04:16pm  #2,830

Fantastic, thank you so much. You are so knowledgable!
Polonius3 Threads: 870 / Posts: 6,373
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 24, 2012, 12:00am  #2,831

PLUSKOTA: pluskota is a synonym of słota - foul, wretched, rainy weather. The verb pluskotać means to splash as when stomping through puddles. Someone who had that habit or (toponymically) an inhabitant of such places as Pluksi or Plukocin migth have acquried the Pluskota nickname-turned.-surname.
Specjalista Threads: 2 / Posts: 43
♂ Joined: Jan 22, 2012
  Apr 24, 2012, 12:09am  #2,832

That's fascinating! thank you!
vidils Threads: - / Posts: 10
♀ Joined: Mar 20, 2012
  Apr 24, 2012, 12:43pm  #2,833

I would be interested in meaning of surname Kierna.Thanks!
Polonius3 Threads: 870 / Posts: 6,373
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 24, 2012, 07:08pm  #2,834

KIERNA: possibly derived from the Old Polish word kiernia (butter-churn). It migth have been the nickname given to a butter-churner or butter-churn maker. Or perhaps a topo tag for someone from Kierzno (Churnville).
Polonius3 Threads: 870 / Posts: 6,373
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 25, 2012, 11:13am  #2,835

RATAJCZYK: root-word rataj (peasant farmer); -czyk is a patronymic ending indicating an offspring, in this case the farmer's..

BEDNARKOW: root-word bednarz (cooper); also possibly a patronymic

GUŹNICZAK: root-word guz (lump, tumor); guźny could have been the nick for someone with lots of lumps on his body and Guźniczak would have been his son.

NOTE: All three above surnames could have laso been of toponymic (place-name) origin.

For more information please contact me.
RP Cich   Apr 26, 2012, 05:10am  #2,836

Family name is CICH and I've traced it back to the early 1500's in south central Poland ( 20 k from Tarnow) and has not been changed or altered in church and cemetery records.
slavsun Threads: 1 / Posts: 5
♂ Joined: Jan 28, 2011
  Apr 26, 2012, 08:50am  #2,837

Hello,

I wonder what is the background on these names:

Kuczyński
Maley
Bekier
Pindel

Also if you provide any genealogy service and more name information I will glady get in touch, thank you.
Polonius3 Threads: 870 / Posts: 6,373
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  Apr 26, 2012, 03:20pm  #2,838

KUCZYŃSKI: topo tag from Kuczyn or Kuczyna

MALEY(?): possibly Anglicized version of Mały (little guy, shrimp, pint size)

BEKIER: Polish phonetic respelling of German Bäcker (baker)

PINDEL: from verb pindzryć się (to primp) -- a fop, someone who fusses over his appearance in front of a mirror.

For more information, heraldic links, etc. concerning the above surnames please contact me.
clew   Apr 28, 2012, 02:16pm  #2,839

Anyone know the meaning of the surname that sounds like Cherwanik?
boletus Threads: 35 / Posts: 1,496
♂ Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  Apr 28, 2012, 02:39pm  #2,840

My guess is Czerwonik, Czerwoniuk or Czerwoniak from the adjective "czerwony" (red). The resulting surname refers to a red object of some sort. Here is one example: "Czarujący 'czerwoniak' na ulicach Poznania" - "The charming 'czerwoniak' on the streets of Poznan" - referring to a photo of an old fashioned red bus, mapofpoland.net/Poznan,photo,2,42451,Czarujacy---czerwoniak---na-ulicach-Poznania.html.

Very rare surname in Poland (16, 17, 54 names in Poland, correspondingly), according to (incomplete) database "Moi Krewni" (my family) moikrewni.pl/mapa/kompletny/czerwoniak.html. Google shows (14,000 11,000 88,000) references to these words.
clew   Apr 30, 2012, 07:58am  #2,841

Thank you for your reply, I found a village in East Prussia, which is also called Czerwanken
progenealogists.com/germany/prussia/pru-c.htm
in the Ukraine is a village named Cherwanyi granit. In the old books I have met the last names with a root Cherwan.
could it be that all these names came from the word Cherwan-cervan something?
marworox   Apr 30, 2012, 10:41am  #2,842

my name is Woronowicz. it originate from ancient east of Poland. today's associations of this name are wrona what means crow, wrony black horse, or Russian voron raven. what else can it mean? what can by real origin of this name?
boletus Threads: 35 / Posts: 1,496
♂ Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  Apr 30, 2012, 11:23am  #2,843

in the Ukraine is a village named Cherwanyi granit.

The Ukrainian words for Polish "czerwony" is "червоний" (red) and "granit" is "граніт" (granite). There is a mineral of that name called "czerwony granit", as shown for example here:
r-granit.ub.ua/goods/view/22816

Red granite. Place of extraction: Kirovohrad region, Novoukrainskiy district, village Evdokimovka. Physical and mechanical properties: ....

There are Ukrainian companies of this name and I would not be surprised if there were also villages named after this mineral too. But what is so special about the noun "granite" in the context of your name search? Ukrainian culture likes the red color, and there are thousands of "red-noun" combinations over there.

Russians also like this colour so much that their word for "red" is close to the word for "beautiful" - красный (krasnyj, krasnyĭ) vs. красивый (krasivyj, krasivyĭ). Ukrainians use the words "червоний" (czerwonyj, chervonyy̆) and "красивий" (krasiwyj, krasyvyy̆), correspondingly. [The first transliteration is Polish, the second is according to uncle Google].

In the old books I have met the last names with a root Cherwan. could it be that all these names came from the word Cherwan-cervan something?

Use whatever transliteration suits you: Polish czerwan or English cherwan, but they are the roots of the word "redness". The corresponding Polish word is "czerwień". Apparently the pre-root comes from the word "czerwiec", as in "czerwiec polski", Polish cochineal, a scale insect formerly used to produce a (very expensive) crimson dye of the same name, colloquially known as "Saint John's blood", http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Polish_cochineal .
Czerwiec in Polish is also a name of the sixth month of the year, June in English. In Ukrainian it is called "Червень" (Czerweń, Chervenʹ). The meaning of this word comes either from fore mentioned insect, or from a "czerw", a bee larva.
boletus Threads: 35 / Posts: 1,496
♂ Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  Apr 30, 2012, 01:56pm  #2,844

clew:
I found a village in East Prussia, which is also called Czerwanken

I forgot to answer this. Yes, there is a village Czerwonki – gmina (municipality) Mrągowo, powiat (district, county) Mrągowo, Warmian-Masurian Voivodship (Province). It has been also known under the names Czerwanken, Czerwonken, Czerwonki, Rotenfelde.

And there is another village Czerwonki in the administrative district of Gmina Radziłów, within Grajewo County, Podlaskie Voivodeship, in north-eastern Poland.

There is also a big village Czerwonak (Old name: Czerwony Młyn, Red Mill) just north-east of Poznań. Renamed Rotental by Germans in 1941.
CuriousGeorgies   Apr 30, 2012, 08:11pm  #2,845

Hi I'm trying to figure out the origins of this Polish last name but so far I cannot come up with anything.
"Bezrudczyk"

Now I am aware that "Czyk" is associated with Polish royality back in the 15th century, under the reign of Kazimierz IV, but I cannot decipher the rest of the last name.
boletus Threads: 35 / Posts: 1,496
♂ Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  May 1, 2012, 12:17am  #2,846

"Czyk" is associated with Polish royality back in the 15th century, under the reign of Kazimierz IV

There is not an iota of truth in this statement.

The suffix -CZYK signifies a Polish version of a son of somebody, such as in RYBACZYK (son of RYBAK, a fisherman), KOWALCZYK (son of KOWAL, a smith). The Ukrainian version would use the suffix -CZUK, Americanized as -CHUCK .

On the other hand, the prefix BEZ- means "without" in Polish.

but I cannot decipher the rest of the last name.

BEZRUDCZYK:

It is very probable that the surname BEZRUDCZYK is connected to the word RUDA, an ORE, except that in the Old Polish that word had several meanings. It mainly meant the same thing which it has now - "an ore, or specifically and iron ore from which iron is melted.'" The second meaning is "a red soil" and the last one means "a swamp". Those three names are not mutually exclusive since it is well known that iron can be found in so-called RUDA DARNIOWA (turf iron ore) and RUDA BAGIENNA (swamp iron ore). The adjective RUDY/RUDA also means a red colour, as it can be seen anywhere where iron is present. And finally, a noun RUDY/RUDA also means a redhead (male/female).

So for example, if an early iron ore prospector, who often came back empty handed, only with samples of barren rocks, BEZ RUDY (with no ore) he could be teased as BEZRUDY.

His son could then inherit the nick BEZRUDCZYK, after his father's nick.
boletus Threads: 35 / Posts: 1,496
♂ Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  May 1, 2012, 05:31am  #2,847

Alternative explanation:
If by any chance BEZRUDCZYK is a corrupted version of BEZRODCZYK then its etymology dramatically changes. The root of the words becomes RÓD (Pan-Slavic ROD), meaning an extended family, a clan, a tribe. From this a family in a narrow sense could be derived: Polish RODZINA, Pan-Slavic RODINA.
Consequently BEZ-ROD-CZYK would mean a son of somebody without family, without parents, orphaned.
Polonius3 Threads: 870 / Posts: 6,373
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  May 1, 2012, 02:04pm  #2,848

Further following that line of reasoning, it might have originally been Bezradczyk. Someone unable to cope with things, a helpless and unresourceful loser could have been locally dubbed bezradny. When he fathered a son: Bezradcyzk.
When we are dealing with old handwritten docments, confusion is often possible. Someone might have not brought together the two prongs of a lower-case handwritten 'a' making it look like a 'u'.
Polonius3 Threads: 870 / Posts: 6,373
♂ Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  May 2, 2012, 07:27am  #2,849

LANCKOROŃSKI: toponymic tag from Lanckorona, a village south of Kraków set up by German colonists in the 13th century; the original German name was Landskrone.
poppylion   May 2, 2012, 03:35pm  #2,850

My last name is Przepasniak. Any clue what this means? All I know is that "iak" means "son of."


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THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

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