Polaron - Get Polish Citizenship / EU Passport now!Witamy, Guest  |  Members

The Ultimate Guide to POLAND
Unanswered [108]  |  Archives [3]

Travel to Poland
Home / Genealogy /answers: 4,160 - page 95 of 139

THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

noreenb Threads: 7
Posts: 658
Joined: Apr 22, 2009
  ♀   Feb 16, 2012, 09:50am  #2,821

Do you think we know everything?


pip Threads: 18
Posts: 1,848
Joined: Jul 4, 2011
  ♀   Feb 16, 2012, 10:20am  #2,822

there is a person on this forum that will tell you. just be patient.

ShawnH Threads: 11
Posts: 2,059
Joined: Jul 2, 2009
  ♂   Feb 16, 2012, 03:38pm  #2,823

Polonius3 was hung out to dry for a period.

He's the guy who usually pipes in with these kind of answers..

Madrala     Feb 16, 2012, 03:44pm  #2,824

ShawnH:
Polonius3 was hung out to dry for a period.


I'm sure delphi will explain soon enough that he's of partially Ukrainian descent, or perhaps Slovak, or eventually Lemko, or even Sorbian (whatever THAT is). You just wait.

boletus Threads: 45
Posts: 1,673
Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  ♂   Feb 17, 2012, 12:01am  #2,825

What does the last name Gizinski (or Gizynski) mean?

Giziński - probably originating from village Giżyn. There are four villages of that name in Poland: one in Mazovia, one in Great Poland and two in Western Pomerania provinces. However, the Mazovian Giżyn (municipality Strzegowo, Mława district) seems to be the most likely candidate, since Giziński's noble family coat of arms is Dołęga (en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dołęga_coat_of_arms), and which in turn is very similar to gmina Strzegowo's coat of arms (pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gmina_Strzegowo).

Some old documents also mention lesser gentry named Giziński vel Giżyński originating from village Giżynek vel Gizinek, municipality Brzuze, Rypin district, Kuiavian-Pomeranian Province. They go back to the 16th century.

boletus Threads: 45
Posts: 1,673
Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  ♂   Edited by: boletus  Feb 17, 2012, 11:04am  #2,826

I found some more information about Giziński family from gmina (municipality) Strzegowo, mentioned in my previous post. The source:
strzegowo.pl.

There are actually two similarly sounding villages located within this gmina: Giżyn and Giżynek. Apparently, it is the latter where Gizińscy came from.

The name Giżyno (today's Giżyn) originate from the old name Giza or Giża, [possibly meaning a hind leg of an ox or a hog]. Until 1349 it was a princely village, later becoming a settlement of average knights and nobles. Later the village has been inherited by Grzywa, Ko¶ciesza coat of arms and Radzymiński family, to be finally owned by Kobylnicki family - averagely wealthy nobles.

The settlement Giżynek was created by parcelling out certain lands in 1538 out of the village Giżyno. Giżynek was settled by lesser gentry and the property was divided among many smallholders. In 1578 they were: Mateusz, Grzegorz, Stanisław, Albert Koszol; Jan and Andrzej Dmoss; Jan, Albert, widow of Andrzej, Albert Sey and Albert Mroczek.

In the following years many lesser noble families inherited here. With time, some knights of the village took the name Gizińscy, Dołęga coat of arms, which shows some kinship with many other families in the area.

Gizińscy resided in this village until the eighteenth century. Not much data has been preserved about this lineage. Until then they were unlikely to travel out, even for the royal elections. However, there was not enough land in this overpopulated village and some of them emigrated to Warsaw and on Rus. They became wealthy, they owned manors in Warsaw and villages on Rus. But Gizińscy always stressed that they originated from Gizinek.

Susan631     Feb 21, 2012, 07:09am  #2,827

Can you help me with two last names: Strejlau and Bobola?

boletus Threads: 45
Posts: 1,673
Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  ♂   Edited by: boletus  Feb 21, 2012, 10:39am  #2,828

Strejlau is a polonized name of Prussian settlers, initially brought to the Dobrzyń area after the second Poland's partition, by the Prussian king Frederick William II. Probable origin: from locality Strehlow, district Demmin, Neubrandenburg.

Bobola is a name of a medieval noble family of Silesian origin. Bobolas received Leliwa coat of arms and some lands from prince Henry the Beard and founded Bobolice settlement in early 13th century. For details in Polish see:
pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bobolowie

In 16th-17th centuries Bobolas were the tenants of the Strachocina estate, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Strachocina .

Andrew Bobola (1591-1657) was a Polish missionary and martyr of the Society of Jesus, known as the apostle of Lithuania and the "hunter of souls", canonized in 1938, http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Andrew_Bobola .

There are several possible origins of the name: 1. "bób" (broad bean), plant of the legume family, its fruit, seed. 2. "bobo" - bogeyman, the fear. 3. for God dismal, martyr.

archiwum Threads: 35
Posts: 406
Joined: Dec 1, 2011
  ♂   Feb 21, 2012, 07:49pm  #2,829

Merged: Czaban

This surname can either be jewish, or tatar. It means shepherd.

I was told it's origin is Turkish. Some jews took this name.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Feb 21, 2012, 09:49pm  #2,830

**GIZYŃSKI**RUTKOWSKI**BABOLA**CUBEK**KRULICKI**MRYGŁOCKI

********************************************************************** ***********************************
GIZIŃSKI/GIŻYŃSKI: root-word giża (hind thigh of livestock); probably topo tag from Giżyn.

RUTKOWSKI: root-word ruta (rue, a herb); probably topo tag from Rutków or Rutkowo

BABOLA: probably variant form of babol, bobak, bobal, babok (bogeyman),

CUBEK: Masurianised form of czubek (top, point, peak)

KRULICKI: variant form of królicki, adjectival form of królik (rabbit); either patronymic for the sdon of soemone nickanemd Królik or topo nick from Królików or similar.

MRYGŁOCKI: possibly Ruthenian respelling of Mrzygłodzki, probably patronymic nick from mrzygłód (miser) – someone so mean he prefers starving than spending a penny.

Susan631     Feb 21, 2012, 11:14pm  #2,831

Dziękuję - Appreciate your help!

caddyski     Feb 22, 2012, 05:51am  #2,832

any info for naliborski? coat of arms?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Feb 22, 2012, 06:49am  #2,833

NALIBORSKI(?): origin uncertain; possibly misspelt toponym from Naliboki in today's Belarus which should have generated the adjectival form Nalibocki: Possibly someone misheard it and wrote down Naliborski. In rapid speech the two sound pretty close. No coat arms goes with this surname.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Edited by: Polonius3  Feb 22, 2012, 12:10pm  #2,834

NALIBORSKI/MALIBORSKI: Since no-one in Poland uses either the Naliborski or Nalibocki surname, perhaps it was originally Maliborski. The shaky hand of a semi-literate peasant might have omitted one of the M's peaks. when signing a document. Or (since the M and N are next to each other on the keyboard), some Ellis Island official could have struck the wrong key producing Naliborski. Whatever the case, over 300 people sign themselves Maliborski, and their single biggest concentration is found in SE Poland's Tarnobrzeg area. Maliborski as well as Malborski are variant toponymic tags for a resident of Malbork .

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Feb 22, 2012, 04:00pm  #2,835

KAWECKI: root-word kawka (jackdaw, bird of the crow family); probably topo tag from Kawka or Kawki. Kawecki used by some 6,000 in today's Poland, the most in Mazowsze.

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Edited by: Polonius3  Feb 22, 2012, 04:15pm  #2,836

PYTEL: flour sack; someone associated with milling might have acquired such a nkkcname, and his son could have been given a patronymic tag such as Pytelowski, Pytlowski, Pytelski, Pytlak or Pytlewicz.

KOVACS: Hungarian occupational nickname for blacksmith.

KWA¦NY: Polish for sour; nickname for a sour puss (someone with a sour disposition) or topo tag for an inhabitant of Kwasy or Kwa¶niów (Sourville).

Nickidewbear Threads: 23
Posts: 862
Joined: Sep 17, 2009
  ♀   Feb 27, 2012, 07:05am  #2,837

Merged: More Queries, Trudnak or Trudniak,,,

  • Trudnak or Trudniak, or Trudnyak (possibly Friedniak)-- in Łapsze Niżne and in Kosice, Slovakia (no Jewish origin known of)
  • Monka-- Łapsze Niżne (Jewish)
  • Focko-- Radom and Kielce, Warszawa, Lódz, Iwieniec, etc. (Jewish). Connected to Zlata Idka and Kosice Fockos (Foczkos)



Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Feb 27, 2012, 03:36pm  #2,838

TRUDNIAK: possibly patronymic tag for the son of someone nicknamed Trudny (difficult, hard to get along with)..

MONKA: variant spelling of m±ka (flour) - good occupational nick for a miller or flour vendor

FOĆKO: possibly endearing form of first name Fortunat.

Nickidewbear Threads: 23
Posts: 862
Joined: Sep 17, 2009
  ♀   Feb 27, 2012, 07:13pm  #2,839

Polonius3:
TRUDNIAK: possibly patronymic tag for the son of someone nicknamed Trudny (difficult, hard to get along with)..

MONKA: variant spelling of m±ka (flour) - good occupational nick for a miller or flour vendor

FOĆKO: possibly endearing form of first name Fortunat.


Well, "Focko" has a non-accented "c" and I knew that "Monka" is the Ashkenazic Jewish, Slavic equivalent of "Miller". But thanks. Meanwhile, I'm wondering if there are any Fockos, etc. on the forum here.

Kaetlyn     Mar 8, 2012, 02:25am  #2,840

The meaning of Dudsic? My mom told me it was a polish last name...?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Mar 8, 2012, 09:40am  #2,841

To my great surprise the name Dudsik (noit Duidsic) actually got recorded in Poland somewhere along the line, although no-one uses it currently. The most common version is:
DUDZIC: root-word: duda (bagpipe), an occuaptional nick for a homespun rural piper or fiddler.

Linda91254     Mar 8, 2012, 04:29pm  #2,842

Hello,

I am researching my family tree and would like to know the meanings of our names. I appreciate any information you can give me. Thank You!

Goniwiecha or Goniwicha

Tyczynski

Pluta

Bolda

Narloch

Slyszewska or Slizewski

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Mar 8, 2012, 07:39pm  #2,843

Linda91254
GONIWIECHA/GONIWIUCHA: from goniwiecha (Old Polish term for bird catcher).

TYCZYŃSKI: root-word: tyka (pole); topo tag from Tyczyny

PLUTA: Old Polish for bad weather (modern Polish: plucha).

BOŁDA: variant form of bałda (bare rock outcropping)

NARLOCH: obscure, uncertain; distorted topo tag from Narol??? Unless it was actually Marloch (one of the humps of the ‘M’ got lost?!). In that case it would trace back to the dialectal verb marlić się (to become wrinkled).

SŁYSZEWSKI: topo nick from Słyszew or Słyszewo or misspelling of ¦liżewski (below)

¦LIŻEWSKI: topo nick from ¦liżowo (now in the lost territories of the WiIno area).

For more information please contact: polonius3@gazeta.pl

kggorfvmrvm     Mar 9, 2012, 07:32am  #2,844

What about Szczombrowski?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Mar 9, 2012, 10:12am  #2,845

SZCZOMBROWSKI:it is rare but exists in Poland; according to Polish name-forming rules it would most likely have originated as a toponymic nick from some locality such as Szczombrów or Szczombrowo, however none such can be found at present; neither is there any word in the dictionary starting wtih szczomb-.

boletus Threads: 45
Posts: 1,673
Joined: Apr 13, 2011
  ♂   Mar 9, 2012, 03:18pm  #2,846

kggorfvmrvm:
What about Szczombrowski?

Rare as it seems to be, there are appearances of the surname Szczombrowski in contemporary Poland. For example, the data base "MoiKrewni", which is not in any way complete, shows 30 such surnames: some in North-West territories, some in Silesia and Lower Silesia - suggesting immigration from the East.

There is indeed some connection with "Kresy" (Eastern Borderlands) since five such persons (Maria, Emilia, Janina, Józefa, Karol) are listed as being murdered on April 2, 1944 in the village Dydiatyn - gmina (municipality) K±kolniki - powiat (county, district) Rohatyn.
Source: records compiled on the basis of the book Stanisław Jastrzębski "Ludobójstwo ludno¶ci polskiej przez OUN-UPA w województwie stanisławowskim w latach 1939-1946" (The genocide of the Polish population by the OUN-UPA in the province Stanislawow, in the years 1939-1946.

One Szczombrowski is also listed in "Poczet szlachty galicyjskiej i bukowińskiej" (Records of Galician and Bukovina nobility) under the following entry:
[Surname: Szczombrowski; Nickname: Londyk; Coat of arms: Sas; Given name: Szczepan; Nobility recognized by: Halicki S±d grodzki (Halicz's Magistrate Court); Year: 1782]

Szczombrowski is also listed among families belonging to the coat of arms "Sas", genealogia.okiem.pl/glossary/glossary.php?word=sas

Googling (Szczombrowski nazwisko), where "nazwisko" stands for "surname", forces the selection of Polish records with these two words used. And there are quite a lot such combinations - 12, 3000 of them. They come from Facebook, Pipl profiles, lists of candidates for local administration positions and for membership of Polish parliament, judicial records, university lists, high school lists, real estate ads, sport events, professional lists and ads, etc.

But google does not show geographical names "Szczombrów" or "Szczombrowo", indeed. Could it be that the "Szczombrowski" surname was created from a cluster of two words "Z Czombrowa", "Z Cz±browa" (of Czombrów, of Czombrowo, of Cz±brów, etc.), as in "the knight Ziemowit of Czombrów"? In such a case the root of the surname Szczombrowski could be one of the two:
cz±ber, cz±br, czomber => a thyme
c±ber, comber => a sheep's back, lumbar part of ox's meat

Googling "z Czombrowa" brings such interesting entries as "Archives of Karpowicz family from Czombrów", "a book 'Letters from Czombrów' by Maria Karpowiczowa", or "Czombrów - epoka Pana Tadeusza" (Czombrów - The era of Pan Tadeusz), see: multipanorama.pl/main.php?muid=11&mid=678&kid=0&oid=0&cid=85dfb 71c85ac53

The place Czombrów is famous for the fact that there apparently was the last private armed assault in Lithuania. In a footnote to his ninth book of "Pan Tadeusz" Adam Mickiewicz writes: "In about 1817, in Novogródek Province, Citizen U. assaulted the whole Garrison of Nowogródek and took its commanders into captivity."
Actually "Citizen U." was some Ignatius Uzłowski of Czarnków. The armed assault; that is, illegal armed forced extortion of somebody's will, was the result of the judicial process against some Siemiradzki, who won a court case against Uzłowski and was about to take over the Czarnków property.


heY     Mar 9, 2012, 04:15pm  #2,847

How about Swieca?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,146
Posts: 7,057
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Mar 9, 2012, 04:27pm  #2,848

¦WIECA: candle

vanesa666 Threads: -
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 9, 2012
  ♀   Mar 9, 2012, 07:08pm  #2,849

Merged: Mean of last name.

Like to know were last name ''KIPNIS'' come from please .

vanesa666 Threads: -
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 9, 2012
  ♀   Mar 9, 2012, 08:52pm  #2,850

Merged: Last name.

Hi sory again Like to know what last name Kipnis come from please and waht means If anyone know please...




Home / Genealogy / Unanswered [this forum]

THE MEANING OF YOUR POLISH LAST NAME, SURNAME?

  Important: If you post a link to a non-English source, please ALWAYS summarize / translate the relevant parts into English!  

To post as guest, enter a temporary and unique username (without password) or login and post as a member.