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-ski/-ska, -scy/ski, -wicz - Polish surnames help

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nikola Threads: 3
Posts: 18
Joined: Dec 7, 2007
  ♀ Dec 19, 2007, 01:07pm  #

I know that if you're a guy you are -ski, a girl you are -ska and if you're married you're -scy/sky

But what rules apply to -ewicz ?

Dziekuje.
x



RJ_cdn Threads: -
Posts: 325
Joined: Sep 10, 2007
  ♂ Edited by: RJ_cdn  Dec 19, 2007, 01:21pm  #

Normally it does not change.
However, you can say (somewhat old fashioned way) for example
-ewiczowa - when talking about Mrs. -ewicz (wife of Mr -ewicz)
-ewiczˇwna - when taking about Miss -ewicz (daughter of Mr/Mrs -ewicz)


nikola Threads: 3
Posts: 18
Joined: Dec 7, 2007
  ♀ Dec 19, 2007, 01:24pm  #

thank you (:
Google wouldn't give me any answers.


RJ_cdn Threads: -
Posts: 325
Joined: Sep 10, 2007
  ♂ Dec 19, 2007, 01:25pm  #

You're welcome


Grzegorz_ Threads: 96
Posts: 7,340
Joined: Nov 16, 2006
  ♂ Dec 19, 2007, 02:37pm  #

Quoting: nikola
I know that if you're a guy you are -ski, a girl you are -ska


In Poland. In some countries (including USA) they say that there must be one version, so usually both men and women are -ski.


telefonitika   Dec 21, 2007, 06:43am  #

nikola wrote:
nikola


i was told the same as you by the polish tutor at college regarding polish surnames :) but sometimes also the woman can choose whether to be a ski or ska really when she becomes married ....


Davey Threads: 18
Posts: 447
Joined: Jun 29, 2007
  ♂ Edited by: Davey  Dec 21, 2007, 09:19pm  #

nikola wrote:
you're married you're -scy/sky


-scy is plural and used when talking about more than one person with the same lastname
I don't -sky is Polish, maybe Russian or Ukrainian


gosiaczek Threads: 3
Posts: 89
Joined: Nov 17, 2007
  ♀ Dec 22, 2007, 06:52am  #

RJ_cdn wrote:
somewhat old fashioned way


yeah, I wouldn't use these forms


SSpringer Threads: 6
Posts: 66
Joined: Sep 19, 2007
  ♂ Aug 1, 2008, 12:36am  #

Thread attached on merging:
what does WICZ stand for at the end of a last name?

what does WICZ stand for at the end of a last name?

DolengeWICZ? thanks i appreciate the help


LAGirl Threads: 10
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Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♀ Aug 1, 2008, 01:19am  #

I think son of. mine was yanowicz


Sasha Threads: 2
Posts: 1,565
Joined: Apr 19, 2008
 Photos: 1  ♂ Aug 1, 2008, 03:00am  #

I would be happy to get that to know as well, but I guess these ending derives from the case of initial noun (that's the feature of slavic languages).

Let me explain that with some Russian last name. For example "Ivanov". The sense of it is "Ivan's son", although -ov doesn't mean "son", that's just an ending that results as an answer on the question "whose".


- Whose's this son? (Chey eto sin?)
- That's the Ivan's son. (Eto Ivanov sin)

And so on... :) I guess Polish language uses the same logic. Anyway... somebody should enlighten me on this issue.


SSpringer Threads: 6
Posts: 66
Joined: Sep 19, 2007
  ♂ Aug 1, 2008, 10:00am  #

i was told that Wicz was a Jewish ending? by the way it looks... i maybe wrong?


JustysiaS Threads: 15
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Joined: Oct 14, 2007
  ♀ Aug 1, 2008, 10:48am  #

my mother always says that people whos surnames end with -wicz (stankiewicz, markiewicz etc.) have roots in Ukraine. i dunno, but that's all i've heard about it.


Sasha Threads: 2
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 Photos: 1  ♂ Aug 1, 2008, 12:46pm  #

SSpringer:
i was told that Wicz was a Jewish ending? by the way it looks... i maybe wrong?


Yeah, sometimes. Abramovich is a good example. :)

JustysiaS:
my mother always says that people whos surnames end with -wicz (stankiewicz, markiewicz etc.) have roots in Ukraine.


Mostly in Belorussia but also in (the) Ukraine. :))


Franek Threads: 21
Posts: 525
Joined: Apr 12, 2008
  ♂ Aug 1, 2008, 02:23pm  #

LAGirl:


I think son of. mine was yanowicz

LA girl>

I was always told that (Son of ) ended with a czyk.

For example, my name is ( Krawczyk ) Krawiec
in English a ( Tailor ).
So I would be known as the son of a tailor. At least,that is what I have been told.


Guest   Mar 1, 2009, 01:00am  #

hello i am carlos occhiuzzi from buenos aires ,my gfather was edward suszczewicz of part of my mother from poland ,for long time i am looking for something about surname suszczewicz .
please ANY information about suszczewicz ,info, contacts ,etc etc , i will appreciate it much
carzzy2003@hotmail.com


Buzz Threads: -
Posts: 5
Joined: Aug 15, 2009
  ♂ Aug 15, 2009, 08:18pm  #

Surnames with the end - wicz have Lithuanian wearing the historical tj meaning pochodz▒ch from areas of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (of Lithuania, of Belarus, of Latvia). Lithuanians in the ethnic meaning it actually »mudzini. Entire the one areas of today's Lithuania, of Belarus, Latvia was determined with Lithuania.
Ukraine before the coming into existence of the Union of the Polish Kingdom and the Grand Duchy of the Lithuanian (1569) entered into the range of Lithuania. After signing the Union Ukraine was included in a Kingdom of Poland.


McCoy Threads: 44
Posts: 1,654
Joined: Jul 3, 2008
  ♂ Aug 15, 2009, 09:25pm  #

family from my mothers side have the '- wicz' last name and from what i ve found theres a town in belarus with the same name.


anubis Threads: -
Posts: 37
Joined: Apr 22, 2009
  ♀ Aug 16, 2009, 06:26am  #

Polish surnames ending in -icz indicate roots in the eastern part of Poland - what is now Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine. As for Jewish names w. same ending - the Jewish pale of settlement in czarist Russia was located in those regions, hence the surnames.


King Sobieski Threads: 7
Posts: 1,041
Joined: Jan 22, 2007
  ♂ Aug 16, 2009, 10:51am  #

wasnt wicz also tacked on the end of names...my last name has the wicz but the story is that a long time ago they emigrated from italy and my last name has a italian city name with wicz on the end.


Zcwblk   Aug 20, 2009, 05:12am  #

My last name is Tobolkiewicz but I beleive it was changed when my grandfather emigrated to the uk


ZIMMY Threads: 10
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  ♂ Aug 20, 2009, 05:25am  #

Zcwblk:
My last name is Tobolkiewicz but I beleive it was changed when my grandfather emigrated to the uk

Was it shortened to Tobolkiewicz? (lol) ...just kidding.

I love the sound of slavic last names; they have so much character to them.


Zcwblk   Aug 25, 2009, 04:10am  #

haha . mee too!


Melanie_M Threads: -
Posts: 11
Joined: Aug 15, 2009
  ♀ Aug 27, 2009, 09:26am  #

I believe them to be of jewish descent. But, it is mostly of Slavic with it..aka Lithuanian-Jew. but it also can be Russian-Jew, etc.


farfaletka Threads: 1
Posts: 5
Joined: Sep 6, 2009
  ♀ Sep 6, 2009, 02:19pm  #

Buzz youre so so right!!
i was reading all of it and finally someone knew what he is writing:)
-icz is lithuanian, but people from ages are traveling ;) so you can find person with endind of name everywhere, mayby written different...


tuboltz   Sep 6, 2009, 07:45pm  #

my name is tobolkiewicz living in the uk, what part of poland were you from?


MaryJ   Jan 21, 2010, 04:51am  #

witz is usually Jewish. As in Horowitz, Abramowitz, etc.
wicz is usually Polish. I heard it meant "son of ".


BrutalButcher Threads: 1
Posts: 608
Joined: Nov 10, 2009
  ♂ Jan 21, 2010, 10:27am  #

Both mean "son of". The thig is that Jews always mispelled the languages they spoke.


EchoTheCat Threads: 1
Posts: 174
Joined: Jan 20, 2010
  ♀ Jan 21, 2010, 10:29am  #

Well if you don't know something , ask Google ! :))

Surnames ending witch -wicz come from Tatars or Armenian. For exemple Abakanowicz, Achmetowicz, Assanowicz, Chazbijewicz (Tatars) and Agopsowicz, Awedykowicz, Isakowicz, Isakiewicz, Manugiewicz, Sarkisiewicz, Torosiewicz, Torosowicz (Armenia)

Surnames ending with -uk come from Ukraine

With -ski, -dzki, -cki endings come from Polish szlachta

With -ow, -ew ending are Russian names.

With -us or -is ending are Lithuania names.

There is a problem with Jewish surnames because until XVIII century, Jews in Poland had no surnames. They lived usually in small communities and named themselves for example as Abraham ibn Tobia (Abraham son of Tobia). In XVIII in Malopolska, which was on Austrian occupation, Jews was made to "named" themselves. And so you can have one of those surnames above and have Jewish ancestors. But generally many of Jewish surnames ending with -berg, -man, -wach, -baum

Surnames such as Uryga (latin:Auriga, eng. waggoner ), Kowal (smith) come from name of profession.

Franek:
I was always told that (Son of ) ended with a czyk.

That's true, but who have surname like Kowalczyk, could be son of smith or... his adjunct. :)


1jola Threads: 34
Posts: 2,901
Joined: Sep 23, 2008
  ♂ Jan 21, 2010, 10:47am  #

EchoTheCat:
With -ski, -dzki, -cki endings come from Polish szlachta

We've always had way more landed gentry than land available in Poland.:)

EchoTheCat:
Surnames such as Uryga (latin:Auriga, eng. waggoner ), Kowal (smith) come from name of profession.

I know a guy with surname ZABIJAK which means KILLER. This is amusing in itself but took on a competely different level of hilarity when the new police cars came out a couple years ago. They are silver/grey with a wide stripe across the doors and resemble the paint scheme of a lot of taxis. He called a taxi, giving his name, went out of the pub after 10 minutes, nicely tanked, and stumbled into the back seat of a police car parked outside asking the " taxi drivers" - Is this for Zabijak?



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