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-ski/-ska, -scy/ski, -wicz - Polish surnames help


nikola Threads: 3 / Posts: 18
Joined: Dec 7, 2007
♀   Dec 19, 2007, 01:07pm  #1

I know that if you're a guy you are -ski, a girl you are -ska and if you're married you're -scy/sky

But what rules apply to -ewicz ?

Dziekuje.
x
RJ_cdn Threads: - / Posts: 279
Joined: Sep 10, 2007
♂   Dec 19, 2007, 01:21pm  #2

Normally it does not change.
However, you can say (somewhat old fashioned way) for example
-ewiczowa - when talking about Mrs. -ewicz (wife of Mr -ewicz)
-ewiczówna - when taking about Miss -ewicz (daughter of Mr/Mrs -ewicz)
nikola Threads: 3 / Posts: 18
Joined: Dec 7, 2007
♀   Dec 19, 2007, 01:24pm  #3

thank you (:
Google wouldn't give me any answers.
RJ_cdn Threads: - / Posts: 279
Joined: Sep 10, 2007
♂   Dec 19, 2007, 01:25pm  #4

You're welcome
Grzegorz_ Threads: 63 / Posts: 6,242
Joined: Nov 16, 2006
♂   Dec 19, 2007, 02:37pm  #5

Quoting: nikola
I know that if you're a guy you are -ski, a girl you are -ska


In Poland. In some countries (including USA) they say that there must be one version, so usually both men and women are -ski.
telefonitika   Dec 21, 2007, 06:43am  #6

nikola wrote:
nikola


i was told the same as you by the polish tutor at college regarding polish surnames :) but sometimes also the woman can choose whether to be a ski or ska really when she becomes married ....
Davey Threads: 14 / Posts: 406
Joined: Jun 29, 2007
♂   Dec 21, 2007, 09:19pm  #7

nikola wrote:
you're married you're -scy/sky


-scy is plural and used when talking about more than one person with the same lastname
I don't -sky is Polish, maybe Russian or Ukrainian
gosiaczek Threads: 3 / Posts: 89
Joined: Nov 17, 2007
♀   Dec 22, 2007, 06:52am  #8

RJ_cdn wrote:
somewhat old fashioned way


yeah, I wouldn't use these forms
SSpringer Threads: 6 / Posts: 65
Joined: Sep 19, 2007
♂   Aug 1, 2008, 12:36am  #9

Thread attached on merging:
what does WICZ stand for at the end of a last name?

what does WICZ stand for at the end of a last name?

DolengeWICZ? thanks i appreciate the help
LAGirl Threads: 9 / Posts: 523
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
♀   Aug 1, 2008, 01:19am  #10

I think son of. mine was yanowicz
Sasha Threads: 2 / Posts: 1,149
Joined: Apr 19, 2008
♂   Aug 1, 2008, 03:00am  #11

I would be happy to get that to know as well, but I guess these ending derives from the case of initial noun (that's the feature of slavic languages).

Let me explain that with some Russian last name. For example "Ivanov". The sense of it is "Ivan's son", although -ov doesn't mean "son", that's just an ending that results as an answer on the question "whose".


- Whose's this son? (Chey eto sin?)
- That's the Ivan's son. (Eto Ivanov sin)

And so on... :) I guess Polish language uses the same logic. Anyway... somebody should enlighten me on this issue.
SSpringer Threads: 6 / Posts: 65
Joined: Sep 19, 2007
♂   Aug 1, 2008, 10:00am  #12

i was told that Wicz was a Jewish ending? by the way it looks... i maybe wrong?
JustysiaS Threads: 15 / Posts: 2,435
Joined: Oct 14, 2007
♀   Aug 1, 2008, 10:48am  #13

my mother always says that people whos surnames end with -wicz (stankiewicz, markiewicz etc.) have roots in Ukraine. i dunno, but that's all i've heard about it.
Sasha Threads: 2 / Posts: 1,149
Joined: Apr 19, 2008
♂   Aug 1, 2008, 12:46pm  #14

SSpringer:
i was told that Wicz was a Jewish ending? by the way it looks... i maybe wrong?


Yeah, sometimes. Abramovich is a good example. :)

JustysiaS:
my mother always says that people whos surnames end with -wicz (stankiewicz, markiewicz etc.) have roots in Ukraine.


Mostly in Belorussia but also in (the) Ukraine. :))
Franek Threads: 13 / Posts: 284
Joined: Apr 12, 2008
♂   Aug 1, 2008, 02:23pm  #15

LAGirl:


I think son of. mine was yanowicz

LA girl>

I was always told that (Son of ) ended with a czyk.

For example, my name is ( Krawczyk ) Krawiec
in English a ( Tailor ).
So I would be known as the son of a tailor. At least,that is what I have been told.
Polonius3 Threads: 1,037 / Posts: 6,823
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
♂   Aug 27, 2008, 09:41am  #16

Merged: FUN WITH POLISH PATRONYMICS (-WICZ, -AK, -UK, -SKI, ETC.)

The "-wicz" ending in Polish, "-vić" in the South Slavonic tongues and "-вич"
(-vich) in Russian are all patronymic endings indicating someone's filiality (sonness).
Other languages also have such features to mention only Peterson, Petersen in teh Germanic langauegs, Perez (son of Pedro) in Spanish, dePierre (French). diPietro (Italian), etc., whose Polish equivalence would be Pietrzak, Pietrzyk, Pietraszek, Piotrowski, Pietraszewski, Pietrzykowski and a slew of others. Other foreign patronymic indicators include Mc, O' (Gaelic), ibn (Arabic) and ben (Hebrew),
Incidentally, Yiddish-speaking Jews living in the Slavonic countries adopted the
-vitz/-wicz ending as in the well-known Judeo-American wine Manischevitz.
But Polish also had several other patronymic endings indicating that someone was eitehr the son or (in the case of occupations) the son or helper/apprentice of someone else. Examples include: Adam Kowalski or Kowalczyk = Adam the blacksmith's son; Bednarski or Bednarczyk = the cooper's boy; Krawczyk = the tailor's son/helper; Adam Pastusiak = the shepherd's/cowherd's son; Woźniak = the coachman's kid; Jasiak, Janik, Janowicz, Jasiewicz, etc. = John's boy; Bartosik = son of Bartosz; Stasiak = son of Staś. Common patronymic endings included:
-czak, -czyk, -wicz, -ski, -ak, -icz, -ic, -ik, -yk and (in the east) also -uk and
-czuk.
z_darius Threads: 14 / Posts: 4,144
Joined: Oct 18, 2007
♂   Aug 27, 2008, 10:43am  #17

but you still haven't explained the origin of the ETC ending ;)
Sasha Threads: 2 / Posts: 1,149
Joined: Apr 19, 2008
♂   Aug 27, 2008, 11:07am  #18

The "-wicz" ending in Polish

I didn't quite understand. You guys have it only at the end of your last names or you have patronymics as well? How does your name show up in passport?

but you still haven't explained the origin of the ETC ending ;)

I think it's like an answer on the question "whose". For instance my first name is Alexander (Sasha is a diminutive) and my father's name is Sergey. Whose am I? Answer "Sergeevich". Eventually I'm Alexander Sergeevich (almost like Pushkin).
osiol Threads: 57 / Posts: 4,179
Joined: Jul 25, 2007
♂   Aug 27, 2008, 01:07pm  #19

Welsh "ap" is another equivalent. It has the same root as Gaelic "mac", and can be found in some Welsh and English surnames:

ap Rhys > Price
ap Richard > Pritchard
ap Owen > Bowen

I found a lot of use of patronyms in the word of Dostoevsky and Gogol (Ivan Ivanovich and Ivan Nikiforovich spring to mind). They certainly seemed to have a bit of fun with it.
In Iceland, they still don't use surnames, just patronyms.

Bjork Gudmunsdottir is literally Gudmun's daughter.
Magnus Magnusson - I wonder if Magnus senior's father was yet another Magnus.

I thought that in Polish culture, patronymic surnames are just relics of an era when they were used as patronyms. Just like with English surnames ending in -son.
clouddancer Threads: - / Posts: 25
Joined: Jun 23, 2008
♀   Aug 27, 2008, 02:02pm  #20

You guys have it only at the end of your last names or you have patronymics as well? How does your name show up in passport?

No, we don't have patronymics. My name is just my given name and my surname. IMHO the original poster is quite wrong lumping together Russian (actively created) patronymics and Polish suffixes that might look like patronymic endings but in fact aren't (or are just fossilized versions of patronymics used centuries ago).
Polonius3 Threads: 1,037 / Posts: 6,823
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
♂   Aug 27, 2008, 06:27pm  #21

I was using the term patronymic to indicate a Polish surname's etymology as opposed to surnames of other origin such as toponymic (based on place-names), occupational, nationality, religion, common objects, characteristics and so on. Polish patronymic surnames do nto have the same function as Russian patronymics such as the Fiodorovich in Ivan Fiorodov Petrov which actually indicates that this peron's father's Christian name was Fiodor (Theodore).
Guest   Mar 1, 2009, 01:00am  #22

hello i am carlos occhiuzzi from buenos aires ,my gfather was edward suszczewicz of part of my mother from poland ,for long time i am looking for something about surname suszczewicz .
please ANY information about suszczewicz ,info, contacts ,etc etc , i will appreciate it much
carzzy2003@hotmail.com
Buzz Threads: - / Posts: 5
Joined: Aug 15, 2009
♂   Aug 15, 2009, 08:18pm  #23

Surnames with the end - wicz have Lithuanian wearing the historical tj meaning pochodząch from areas of the Grand Duchy of Lithuania (of Lithuania, of Belarus, of Latvia). Lithuanians in the ethnic meaning it actually Żmudzini. Entire the one areas of today's Lithuania, of Belarus, Latvia was determined with Lithuania.
Ukraine before the coming into existence of the Union of the Polish Kingdom and the Grand Duchy of the Lithuanian (1569) entered into the range of Lithuania. After signing the Union Ukraine was included in a Kingdom of Poland.
McCoy Threads: 32 / Posts: 1,397
Joined: Jul 3, 2008
♂   Aug 15, 2009, 09:25pm  #24

family from my mothers side have the '- wicz' last name and from what i ve found theres a town in belarus with the same name.
anubis Threads: - / Posts: 36
Joined: Apr 22, 2009
♀   Aug 16, 2009, 06:26am  #25

Polish surnames ending in -icz indicate roots in the eastern part of Poland - what is now Lithuania, Belarus, Ukraine. As for Jewish names w. same ending - the Jewish pale of settlement in czarist Russia was located in those regions, hence the surnames.
King Sobieski Threads: 5 / Posts: 796
Joined: Jan 22, 2007
♂   Aug 16, 2009, 10:51am  #26

wasnt wicz also tacked on the end of names...my last name has the wicz but the story is that a long time ago they emigrated from italy and my last name has a italian city name with wicz on the end.
Zcwblk   Aug 20, 2009, 05:12am  #27

My last name is Tobolkiewicz but I beleive it was changed when my grandfather emigrated to the uk
ZIMMY Threads: 8 / Posts: 1,825
Joined: Feb 21, 2009
♂   Aug 20, 2009, 05:25am  #28

Zcwblk:
My last name is Tobolkiewicz but I beleive it was changed when my grandfather emigrated to the uk

Was it shortened to Tobolkiewicz? (lol) ...just kidding.

I love the sound of slavic last names; they have so much character to them.
Zcwblk   Aug 25, 2009, 04:10am  #29

haha . mee too!
Melanie_M Threads: - / Posts: 10
Joined: Aug 15, 2009
♀   Aug 27, 2009, 09:26am  #30

I believe them to be of jewish descent. But, it is mostly of Slavic with it..aka Lithuanian-Jew. but it also can be Russian-Jew, etc.


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-ski/-ska, -scy/ski, -wicz - Polish surnames help

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