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-ski/-ska, -scy/ski, -wicz - Polish surnames help

Quinn Threads: -
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  ♀   Jan 26, 2011, 01:40pm  #61

Oh yes, definitely. :)


NomadatNet Threads: 3
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  ♂   Jan 27, 2011, 09:02am  #62

Jaroslav and Jaroslaw. Is there any difference?

Olaf Threads: 6
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  ♂   Jan 27, 2011, 09:37am  #63

The difference is that letter v is not present in Polish language, so Jaroslav would be misspeling.

gumishu Threads: 18
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  ♂   Edited by: gumishu  Feb 8, 2011, 10:30pm  #64

Quinn:
So -icz is probably a polonised form of -ičius, I guess.


hardly (or actually the other way round): - icz suffix is of Slavic origin and has a definite meaning - (owicz , ewicz are further extentions of the suffix for historical grammatical reasons)
-icz (and -ewicz, -owicz) means a son of (also later as descendant of ) as in:

pan -> panicz - a son of a pan i.e. lord

Jarosław -> Jarosławowicz - a son (or later historically also a descendant - which later turned into a surname) of Jarosław

Mickiewicz - a son/ descendant of Mitko - Mitko being some Ruthenian first name

carewicz - a son of a tsar (pol. car)

this is also the origins of Russian patronimia - Ivan Petrovich - Ivan a son of Peter


-iczius form is actually a lithuanisation of a Slavic form of name. period
I honestly doubt -icz (or -ic) suffix exists (and has a definte function ie. meaning in
Lithuanian)



Quinn:
There's always been a big dispute whether Mickiewicz was Polish or Lithuanian writer. He is also said to have some Tatar roots, and this would explain the origin of his surname.


I am not that sure but I guess Mickiewicz knew little Lithuanian - never left anything written in Lithuanian to my knowledge - if he considered himself a 'Litwin' it was in now obsolete meaning: a citizen of the former Duchy of Lithuania which extended much further than the current extent of Lithuanian language territory

ella3     Apr 28, 2011, 08:26pm  #65

Hello,
I've been trying trace my father's side back and have been stuck at my great great grandfather. His last name was Taraszkiewicz. My great grandmother told us over the years that he was from Lithuania, moved to Poland with his family, and then eventually came to the US around 1904. I have been able to find US census information of him, my great grandmother, and the rest of their family but I haven't been able to find any immigration information or anything about either him or his wife before they came here. She said she thinks he changed his name which isn't surprising, but does anyone know of any variations of the surname?

brslaw     Dec 15, 2011, 03:27am  #66

1jola
We've always had way more landed gentry than land available in Poland.:)

--good one. Although "ski" is commonly said to be solely a szlachta suffix, it is not always the case. I think "ewski" is exclusively a slachta suffix. Meaning that all names that end in "ewski" were members of szlachta and probably from historic prussian area (before it became german). I'm glad we don't have szlachta privileges any longer. we are now a republic after all :)

brett mcleary     Mar 16, 2012, 04:23pm  #67

polish name help

i have a old friend i am trying to find own lived in Australia but i can not find her name any where and i think i may be spelling it wrong
my friends name was ANNA and i think her last name was pronounced L-U-CHI F SKI or L-U-SH-E-F-SKI and all i can find even close to ether of them is LUCCHESI
can some one please help me as she was a very good friend during a very hard time in my life and i would very much like to see her again.

boletus Threads: 46
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  ♂   Mar 16, 2012, 05:43pm  #68

brett mcleary:
i may be spelling it wrong

Yes, you definitely spell it wrong. Pronunciation-wise, English digraphs "CH" and "SH" are roughly comparable to Polish "CZ" and "SZ".


Here is a popularity list of Luczewski-like names, according to google (A) and MoiKrewni (B) (*):
Luczewski - 14,500(A), 48(B)
Łuczewski - 73,600(A), 12(B)
Kluczewski - 200,000(A), 597(B)

Luszewski - 1,450(A), 14(B)
Łuszewski - 29,600(A), 0(B)
Kluszewski - 130,000(A), 30(B)

Those are male versions of the name. The female versions end with -ska, not with -ski. Try something like this in google:
"Anna Kluczewska" Australia ==> 706 results, here you go.

======
(*)
Google: world-wide, multiple reference to the same person very likely
MoiKrewni, Polish database based on voluntary declarations, very incomplete, refers only to Poland, sometimes separately to Germany and Switzerland. See moikrewni.pl/mapa/

musicwriter Threads: 6
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  ♂   Mar 17, 2012, 04:51am  #69

Some Polish surnames have only one syllable, like Gzik, Prus, Dzik, Mruk. Kott.

Tereska     Jun 8, 2012, 11:09pm  #70

What is Polish szlachta? My surname is Legierski. What part of Poland does this come from? I have searced online and have found a few around Istebna & Koniakow.

Mr Grunwald Threads: 23
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  ♂   Jun 9, 2012, 01:18am  #71

Tereska:
What is Polish szlachta?


Polish nobility, mind you not always aristocrats ;)

During Rzeczpospolita Obojga Narodów they were the protectors of the realm and later on the biggest party holders on earth.
If I am not mistaken if you served as a Winged Hussar (Husaria) you could become enobled.

Bieganski Threads: 8
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  ♂   Edited by: Bieganski  Jun 9, 2012, 01:30am  #72

Tereska:
What is Polish szlachta? My surname is Legierski. What part of Poland does this come from? I have searced online and have found a few around Istebna & Koniakow.


Szlachta is the name for the privileged social class which existed for a time in Poland (and Lithuania) until it was formally abolished in the 1920s and never restored.

It's not clear from your post if you believe Legierski was a part of this higher strata of Polish society in much older times. There is a list of szlachta here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_szlachta but the surname Legierski does not appear among the several hundred names shown. If Legierski ever had been szlachta it would have no recognition or significance in Poland today anyway. It's just another name in a phone directory.

But there is a notable person by the name of Krystian Legierski who lives in Poland. He is Afro-Polish, a member of Poland's Green Party, and an activist in Poland's Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender (LGBT) community. His wikipedia profile does mention he was born in Koniakow which is one of the villages you identified as being the origins of the Legierski name in your own research.

I found another website and email address for him here: http://www.zieloni2004.pl/Krystian-Legierski-63profil.htm However, I don't know if this contact information for him is current or if his knowledge of languages other than Polish is any good. Since he is busy in politics and social issues he may not be interested in corresponding with people - especially foreigners - regarding genealogy.

boletus Threads: 46
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  ♂   Jun 9, 2012, 10:38am  #73

Tereska:
My surname is Legierski. What part of Poland does this come from? I have searced online and have found a few around Istebna & Koniakow.

According to "Moi Krewni" (My relatives) database, there are 888 Legierski persons registered in Poland - most of them in Silesia, with their largest concentration in Cieszyn County (579), Żywiec County (57) and town of Bielsko-Biała (22).

So yes, Istebna and Koniaków are in Cieszyn County - in Beskid ¦l±ski mountain range.
Bieganski:
But there is a notable person by the name of Krystian Legierski

He was born in Koniaków, Cieszyn County.

translated from a source in Cieszyn Silesian dialect:
There are very few names in Cieszyn Silesia, ending with -ski; much less than anywhere else in Poland. Those few are mostly formed from an occupation (Milerski < milerz = dealing with wood or coal gasification), proper name (Wałaski < wałach = gelding) or common word (Legierski < legier = resting place).

Silesian "legier" word stems from the German adjective "leger", meaning: casual, informal, lax, laissez-fair.

Tereska     Jun 14, 2012, 08:31pm  #74

Many thanks for your reply. It was really interesting to find out the meaning of my surname. How would I find details about my grandparents who were born in Poland?

Tereska     Jun 14, 2012, 08:44pm  #75

Many thanks for all the information. My father and his parents were all born in Koniakow but I don't have any more details about other family members.

boletus Threads: 46
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  ♂   Edited by: boletus  Jun 16, 2012, 06:29pm  #76

mods: I realize that this post wanders into off topic area but I am responding to a direct question of a new poster, who does not seem to be familiar with the rules here.

Tereska:
It was really interesting to find out the meaning of my surname. How would I find details about my grandparents who were born in Poland?


To start with: Get as much as possible of the vital data regarding your father and grandparents: given names, dates of birth, marriage, death. I am assuming you live in USA, so you could get some of this data from local records: books, papers, cemeteries, parishes, voting registrations, census data, etc.

For example, this webpage: Emmigration from Triple-village: Istebna, Koniaków, Jaworzynka to USA. describes life of Cieszyn Highlanders, who settled in mining towns around Sheridan, Wyoming: Dietz, Acme, Model, Carneyville (later Kleenburn), Monarch, Kooi. There were 20 Legierski people living in Sheridan County at some time. There were also some Legerskis (with slightly different spelling) around there; one list of Red Cross donors (of 10$ or less) during the WWI, contains the following Legerski names: John Legerski Kiepus, Mike Legerski, John Legerski, Paul Legerski, Joe Legerski, Mike Legerski, John Legerski - all from Kooi, and George Legerski from Acme.

Another good source of information are Ellis Islands Immigration records, publicly available. You can scan them for various legitimate variations of the surname Legierski, Legerski, Legersky. One good soul has extracted a list of all immigrants that have come to USA from the so-called "Three-village" (Trójwie¶) in Cieszyn Silesia: Istebna, Koniaków, Jaworzynka - in a period of about 20 years, between 1903-01-26 and 1923-12-10. This list is available here Ellis Island immigrant list by date and ship. You can extract from there all Legierski/Legerski/Legersky records for this period. [If this list does not cover the period of your interest, then you would have to go back to the original Ellis Island records]

Here are few observations, coming from that list:
There are 10 records for Legierski, 19 for Legerski and 6 for Legersky. Of the latter surname two persons were identified as Bohemians (Czechs) from Koniakov; one from a mysterious village Kanighaw, Hungary; and two as Polish from Koniakow, Austria.

I do not know whom to blame for all those misspellings: the clerks in Antwerp or (mostly) Bremen or the immigration officials in Ellis Island. I somehow cannot believe that any German clerk would misspell Silesia as Siberia or Tilesia; and Galicia as Galicy.

Here are the name variations (mostly misspellings) you can find there:

Polish Galicja, Austrian Galitzen, English Galicia => Galicy, Galicia, Galizia

Koniaków => Kaniakow, Kanighaw (Hungary), Komakov, Komakow, Koniakan, Koniakaw, Koniakov, Koniokow , Konikow

Istebna => Fstebue, Istebna, Istebne, Istebuc, Jistebna, Jstebna, Jstebosa, Tstebna, Tstebria

Silesia => Tilesia, Siberia, Silesia

Jaworzynka => Jaworzinka, Jaworzynka, Yaworzynka

After you have clearly identified the American side of your grandparents life, you need to continue your search in Poland. The task is unfortunately not that easy, since there is no central archive yet for that area. There is some work being done on digitizing all the archives of Bielsko-Żywiec diocese to which Istebna deanery (dekanat) belongs - with its various parishes in Istebna, Koniaków and Jaworzynka. Until they finish their digitizing work all you can do at the moment is to contact specific parishes and require copies of specific baptism, marriage or death certificates. Such service is not very expensive, but it is not free. I am assuming that your grandparents were Roman Catholics. In case they were of Evengelical-Augsburg (Lutheran) faith you can browse the certificates in both standard and digital form at Tschammer's Library and Archives in Cieszyn, http://www.biblioteka.cieszyn.org.pl/ .
You can find more about this subject (in Polish) here: http://gazetacodzienna.pl/artykul/kultura/jak-szukac-przodkow-stela-1

Tereska     Jun 23, 2012, 10:34pm  #77

Thanks for the information. Alas I do not live in the USA, I live in England.

boletus Threads: 46
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  ♂   Jun 24, 2012, 12:23am  #78

Tereska:
Thanks for the information. Alas I do not live in the USA, I live in England.

The joke is on me. Why do I even get involved in this charity?

H. Shymanski     Jul 12, 2012, 02:42am  #79

The head of the Jewish council in the Lodz ghetto was Rumkowski. Consequently I believe it is somewhat a myth that all "ski's" in Poland are Christians. In fact there are many polish last names ending in "ski" that are Jewish surnames

Zman     Jul 12, 2012, 03:28am  #80

When living in Poland they couldn't care less if their name ended in -ski (standard) or -sky (unusual). Methinks, them jewish immigrants with slavic names had somehow wanted to differentiate themselves from those "cathols" upon arrival in the US of A and hence as of now those ending in -sky mean: Jewish or confused, and those ending in -ski mean: Polish or confused :-)

Nickidewbear Threads: 23
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  ♀   Jul 12, 2012, 03:48am  #81

We are Jewish "-wicz"es and "-ski"s, far from noble (though as I've mentioned, Pop-Pop likes to claim otherwise)--ChernetSKI, DaniłOWICZ, MorgieWICZ, AndruleWICZ. "-owicz" is key because "-owicz" (at least when compared to "-czyk") was meant to denote Jewishness (I can't find the source, though--argh!).

boletus Threads: 46
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  ♂   Edited by: boletus  Jul 14, 2012, 05:25pm  #82

AndruleWICZ. "-owicz" is key because "-owicz" (at least when compared to "-czyk") was meant to denote Jewishness (I can't find the source, though--argh!).

This is just an urban legend. Get over it.

The difference between -owicz and -ewicz is of no great importance to non-linguists; some names tend to show up with one or the other, and some show up with both. But the basis meaning of X-owicz or X-ewicz is "son of X.

What happened here is that the possessive ending -ow/-ew had the suffix -icz tacked onto it. That suffix -icz or -ycz is how Poles once said "son of," so that "son of Jan" was Janicz or Janycz; "son of Kuba" was Kubicz or Kubycz. But as time went on the Poles were influenced by the tendency of other Slavs to use -owicz or -ewicz instead of plain -icz.

By the way, -owicz is just the Polish way of spelling the suffix we see in many other Slavic names as -ovich (Anglicized spelling) or -ovič (the so-called haček in Czech). The spelling varies from language to language, but it almost always means "son of."

polishroots.org/Research/SurnameSearch/Surnamesendings/tabid/118/Default.aspx

[Correction: in the original text they printed the words -oviĉ and haĉek using character "c with circumflex". That's wrong; haček (a little hook) should be spelled using "c with caron"]

Additional grammatical explanation:
The forms -owy (masculine), -owa (feminine), -owe (plural) are known as Possessive Adjective forms. The possessive adjective is widely used in several Slavonic languages, such as Czech , and particularly often in Upper Sorbian. This form is rarely used in Polish, with the exception of X-ew-icz and X-ow-icz forms (son of X), discussed above. Oh, wait: here comes one example I just found: młodzieżowe.

Upper Sorbian (Hornjoserbąćina) is a minority language spoken by Sorbs in Germany in the historical province of Upper Lusatia (Hornja Łuľica in Sorbian), which is today part of Saxony. It is grouped in the West Slavic language branch, together with Lower Sorbian, Czech, Polish, Slovak and Kashubian.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Upper_Sorbian_language

For example, in Upper Sorbian the possessive adjective is the normal method of expressing what is conveyed by the genitive in many other languages.
Compare this phrase in Polish and in Upper Sorbian:

Upper Sorbian: Jan-owa kniha (Jan's book), possessive adjective form
Polish: Ksi±żka Jan-a (book of Jan), genitive form

The other possessive form, corresponding to -ow is -in, -yn.

Upper Sorbian: Hilľ-iny wopyt (Hilľa's visit)
Polish: Wizyta Hilży (Visit of Hilľa)

Upper Sorbian: Naąego nan-owe knihi (Our father's books)
Polish: Ksi±żki naszego ojca (Books of our father)

boletus Threads: 46
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  ♂   Jul 14, 2012, 06:00pm  #83

Zman:
AndruleWICZ. "-owicz" is key because "-owicz" (at least when compared to "-czyk") was meant to denote Jewishness (I can't find the source, though--argh!).

OOPS, I quoted the wrong person. Should be:
Nickidewbear:
AndruleWICZ. "-owicz" is key because "-owicz" (at least when compared to "-czyk") was meant to denote Jewishness (I can't find the source, though--argh!).


InWroclaw Threads: 121
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  ♂   Jul 14, 2012, 06:06pm  #84

We are Jewish "-wicz"es and "-ski"s, far from noble (though as I've mentioned, Pop-Pop likes to claim otherwise)--ChernetSKI, DaniłOWICZ, MorgieWICZ, AndruleWICZ. "-owicz" is key because "-owicz" (at least when compared to "-czyk") was meant to denote Jewishness (I can't find the source, though--argh!).

Are you sure? This website as Boletus says suggests it is just a name meaning son of etc. [polishroots.org/Research/SurnameSearch/Surnamesendings/tabid/118/Default.aspx]

I'd be interested in any website or source that shows otherwise for the suffix " owicz "

sofijufka Threads: 2
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  ♀   Jul 14, 2012, 06:12pm  #85

Nickidewbear:
owicz" is key because "-owicz" (at least when compared to "-czyk") was meant to denote Jewishness (I can't find the source, though--argh!).


hmmm... I think this 'owicz" suggested rather town dwellers [like -in Sebastian Klonowic/z] , if joined with first name for example: Bogdanowicz http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bogdanowicz_(herb_szlachecki) - it means that this family was ennobled

InWroclaw Threads: 121
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  ♂   Jul 14, 2012, 06:21pm  #86

From this link, maybe? Book extract (page 73, Jewish Cultural Tapestry...by S M Lowenstein)

"...In Eastern Europe where most Ashkenazic Jews lived, governments often used Slavic translations of the Yiddish surnames...The 'owicz' ending would have varied spellings in other Eastern European languages...German scribes [would use] 'owitz'... "

Not sure if that's my misinterpreting what it says but it seems to be in a book about Jewish people's names, so... maybe the endings/suffix "owicz" is of Jewish heritage.

Nickidewbear Threads: 23
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  ♀   Jul 14, 2012, 06:55pm  #87

"...In Eastern Europe where most Ashkenazic Jews lived, governments often used Slavic translations of the Yiddish surnames...The 'owicz' ending would have varied spellings in other Eastern European languages...German scribes [would use] 'owitz'... "

Not sure if that's my misinterpreting what it says but it seems to be in a book about Jewish people's names, so... maybe the endings/suffix "owicz" is of Jewish heritage.

It wasn't that source, but maybe that's just one more source that proves my point.

hmmm... I think this 'owicz" suggested rather town dwellers [like -in Sebastian Klonowic/z] , if joined with first name for example: Bogdanowicz

Not us. We owned a farm in Lipsk, and Jewish non-nobles would've never married gentile nobles. The Andrulewiczes and Morgiewiczes married Chernetskis and Danilowiczes.

boletus Threads: 46
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  ♂   Edited by: boletus  Jul 14, 2012, 11:11pm  #88

[
sofijufka:
hmmm... I think this 'owicz" suggested rather town dwellers [like -in Sebastian Klonowic/z]

Wrong example. He was a son of Jan Klon - a tenant of a farm and mill on Orla river - and Anna Pietrzałek. Not a dweller of town of Klonów or something.
http://pl.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sebastian_Fabian_Klonowic

Nickidewbear:
It wasn't that source, but maybe that's just one more source that proves my point.

This proves nothing. You just need to learn to listen a bit. Did you miss my rant about Possessive Adjective forms? Let me try it again.

Some Slavonic languages use this form to a lesser of greater extent. Have you ever noticed how Czech female surnames are formed? Their -OVÁ (Polish corresponding form is -OWA) form originally meant to express possession, as wives used to belong to their husbands. Now this form is used as a general feminine inflexion of male surnames.

Novák ==> Novák-ová (implicitely Novák's wife or daughter)
Haneą ==> Haneą-ová
Bartoą ==> Bartoą-ová
Havlík ==> Havlík-ová
Krk ==> Krk-ová
©lytr ==> ©lytr-ová
Kučera ==> Kučer-ová
Homolka => Homolk-ová
Housle ==> Housl-ová
Mičko ==> Mičk-ová
©týblo ==> ©týbl-ová

Similar naming pattern used to exist in Polish as well:
Zaj±c ==> Zaj±c-owa
Wróbel => Wróbl-owa (or Wróbelowa)
etc.

So, I do not see any Jewiness in here so far. Do you?

STEP 2: Combining "son of" (possessive form) and "little one"

As another example, let us turn our attention to surnames of some South Slavic groups such as Serbs, Croats, Montenegrins, and Bosniaks. They traditionally end with the suffixes "-ič", "-ić" and "-vić" (often transliterated to English and other western languages as "ic", "ich", "vic" or "vich". The v is added in case the name to which "-ić" follows ends on a vowel, to avoid double vowels with the "i" in "-ić".) which are diminutives meaning "a little one" indicating descent. Croatian, Bosnian and Serbian also use the possessive form "son of" (or "daughter of"), indicated by -OV.

So for example, if your ancestor was named Petr (Petar), his son could be named Petr-ov (son of Petr), whose son in turn could bear surname Petr-ov-ić - a little one born to the son of Petr.
On the other hand, Petr-ić means Peter's little one.

Similarly,
Stefan => Stefan-ov-ić
Stefan => Stefan-ow-ić.
Kovač (blacksmith) => Kovač-ević (could not use Kovač-ić according to the above pronunciation rule)

Bosniak Muslim names follow the same formation pattern but are usually derived from proper names of Islamic origin, often combining archaic Islamic or feudal Turkish titles i.e.
Mula-omer-ov-ić
©aban-ov-ić
Hadľi-hafiz-beg-ov-ić etc.

Oh, no, Muslims use the -owicz as well.? :-)

Nickidewbear:
Not us. We owned a farm in Lipsk, and Jewish non-nobles would've never married gentile nobles. The Andrulewiczes and Morgiewiczes married Chernetskis and Danilowiczes.

You are way off topic. Pay attention, girl. We are discussing your (erroneous) claim that surnames ending in -owicz indicate Jewish origin. This has nothing to do with a farm in Lipsk, etc.

InWroclaw:
"...In Eastern Europe where most Ashkenazic Jews lived, governments often used Slavic translations of the Yiddish surnames...The 'owicz' ending would have varied spellings in other Eastern European languages...German scribes [would use] 'owitz'... "

Not sure if that's my misinterpreting what it says but it seems to be in a book about Jewish people's names, so... maybe the endings/suffix "owicz" is of Jewish heritage.

Nowhere it says that -owicz suffix indicate Jewishness.

On the list of typical Jewish surnames, http://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Appendix:Jewish_surnames, there is a short list of -owicz names:
Aron-owicz (from Aaron)
Abram-owicz (from Abraham)
Berk-owicz
Dawyd-owicz (from David)
Josel-ewicz (from Joseph)
Szlom-owicz (from Szloma, Solomon)
Lejb-owicz (from Loeb, Loew, Leib, Loewe (lion))
Alper-owicz (from German Heilbron, Halpern, Halperin, Heilbronn)
Herszk-owicz ?
Kantor-owicz (from kantor)

This is a very, very small list - only 12 or so surnames, out of hundreds and hundreds listed there. And what do they have in common? They are mostly patronymic names, made of Hebrew or Yiddish first names - following standard forming rules for Slavonic languages.

And yet Nickidewbear concluded that "-owicz" (…) was meant to denote Jewishness. Like what it supposed to be, a hidden handshake? It's not -owicz that tells the story of the surname origin, is the root of the surname that clearly indicates the Jewishness.

I just extracted from a long list of 20,000 surnames, of people currently living in Poland, the list of names ending in -owicz. That's 337 surnames of this pattern. By Nickidewbear's claim all of them must be Jewish surnames? Can she prove it? Of course she cannot. Most of them are patronymic names, stemming from Polish, Belarusian and Ukrainian given names. Yes, and a precious few seem like being of Jewish or German origin:
Dawidowicz, Abramowicz, Lewkowicz, Naumowicz, Majchrowicz, Lewandowicz, Lemanowicz, Frydrychowicz, Samsonowicz, Bursztynowicz, Moszkowicz, Kantorowicz, Żydowicz, Afeltowicz, Arentowicz, Hermanowicz, Kurantowicz, Majerowicz, Achramowicz, Lazarowicz, Berkowicz, Melerowicz, Jarmołowicz, Serafinowicz,

Oh, well, 24 names of possible candidates for Jewishness (there might more, but I have no time for close examination). Well, there are also some 23 Ruthenian/Lithuanian/Tatar names with this pattern: Wa¶kowicz, Fedorowicz, Fiedorowicz, Daniłowicz, Litwinowicz, Semenowicz, Osipowicz, Trochimowicz, Mi¶kowicz, Walentynowicz, Fiłonowicz, Rusinowicz, Tatarowicz, Bytrymowicz, Iwanowicz, Prokopowicz, Sidorowicz, Popowicz, Ławrynowicz, Ostapowicz, Bohdanowicz, Wołkowicz, Zubowicz,

So we still have to allocate some 270 surnames or so. What to do with the given names that sound Polish, or are not formed from given names, such as Kotowicz (from Kot, this from kot, a cat)?
Wójt (village mayor), Sak (bag), Karp (carp), W±s (moustache), Przybył (newcomer), Wojnar (war maker), Stary (old), Grab (hornbeam), Ruta (rue), Obuch (ax head), Dziad (lout), Ułan (uhlan), Kos (blackbird), Kot (cat), Bednarz (cooper), Grzywna (fine), Kłos (corn ear), D±b (oak), Kiełb (mullet), Łuk (bow), Drozd (thrush), Baran (ram), Kozioł (goat), Broda (chin), Bober (beaver), Mróz (frost), Ogród (garden), Miech (bellow), Kret (mole), Rak (crayfish), Lis (fox), Orzeł (eagle), Groch (pea), Bób (broad bean), Nosek (little nose), Nos (nose), Górny (upper), Czyż (syskin), Jawor (maple), ¦miech (laughter), Gajda (bagpipe), Tur (auroch), Topor (ax), Chleb (bread), Rozmysł (intent), Kiełek (sprout), Włos (hair), Kołtun (babbitt), Włoch (Italian), Szpak (starling), Dziura (hole), Wykręt (dodge), Dzik (boar), Wdowiec (widower), Ostrów (holm), Kępa (hurst), B±k (gadfly), Dzieciuch (childish) ...

And the Polish given names:
Adam, Urban, Aleks, Piotr, Stach, Lach, Bogdan, Józef (?), Paweł, Kasper, Marek, Klim, Jan, Stefan, Czech, Augustyn, Lech, Antoni, Roman, Ignacy, Wiktor, Jakub (?), Maksym, Kondrat, Piech, Ciechan, Michał, Wojciech, Zych, Kacper, Sobek, Grzenko, Wyszko, Kochan, Wawrzyn, Kuba, Węgrzyn, Kuryło, Zygmunt, Gregor, Olko, Bartek, Teodor, Witek, Gaweł, Piotrek, Gasper, Tomek, Balcer, Krzysztof, Szymek, Fabian, Rafał, ¦cisło, Konstanty, Leszek, Miron ...

So no, the Nickidewbear's claim does not hold any water. And if this is not enough I can also provide you with links (some of them Jewish) how the process of making Jewish surnames really looked like - first in the free and later in the occupied Poland.

InWroclaw Threads: 121
Posts: 2,273
Joined: Mar 10, 2012
  ♂   Jul 14, 2012, 11:23pm  #89

That's a lot of research you've done there Boletus.

I can't comment on the accuracy of the book, I just linked to it. Perhaps the author there was referring primarily to the owicz surnames you quoted, namely -

boletus:
Dawidowicz, Abramowicz, Lewkowicz, Naumowicz, Majchrowicz, Lewandowicz, Lemanowicz, Frydrychowicz, Samsonowicz, Bursztynowicz, Moszkowicz, Kantorowicz, Żydowicz, Afeltowicz, Arentowicz, Hermanowicz, Kurantowicz, Majerowicz, Achramowicz, Lazarowicz, Berkowicz, Melerowicz, Jarmołowicz, Serafinowicz,


If on the other hand the author would maintain all owicz have Jewish origins, it would be interesting to see how he arrives at that conclusion beyond that which he described on page 73 there.

Nickidewbear Threads: 23
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  ♀   Edited by: Nickidewbear  Jul 14, 2012, 11:26pm  #90

This is why you're on my ignore list, boletus. First of all, "Adam" and "Daniło", as well as "Jakub" among other names (e.g., Stefan), come directly from the Hebrew and other languages in the Bible. Secondly, I said that I couldn't find the original source; and yet, you resort to flank attacks and accuse me of being stupid or a liar. Thirdly, many Jews took or created Polish and other non-Hebrew surnames in the Diaspora.



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-ski/-ska, -scy/ski, -wicz - Polish surnames help

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