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Polish Swear Words

Wyspianska     Jan 19, 2009, 03:11pm  #

JustysiaS:
zajebać means either to steal something, or to kill [somebody/something].

or to say somethig funny/stupid: 'ale zajebales' hehe
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  ♀   Jan 19, 2009, 03:19pm  #

Wyspianska:
or to say somethig funny/stupid: 'ale zajebales' hehe

jebać is such a versatile word!
pierogi     Jan 29, 2009, 11:58am  #

Growing up in the Buffalo area, whenever it was cold out (often) my older relatives would say what sounded like "shimna holeda" - what is the correct Polish spelling and what does this translate to in English? I believe it means "cold as hell", "cold as f__k", or "freezing my balls off" but that's just my guess as my grandmother only responds to my request by saying my full name in disbelief;)

I'm also seeking spelling and translation of "yaja boat"- what I believe to mean "let's go damnit"

Thank you!
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  ♂   Jan 29, 2009, 12:32pm  #

pierogi:
"shimna holeda"

zimno jak cholera
pierogi:
"cold as f__k"

zimno jak (sam) skurwysyn
pierogi:
"yaja boat"

?? maybe jebać (to) - which means fu&k it
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  ♂   Jan 29, 2009, 05:26pm  #

Kurwa, muszę iść spać
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  ♂   Jan 29, 2009, 05:27pm  #

pierdol to, zostan jeszcze godzinke
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  ♂   Jan 30, 2009, 01:45pm  #

Jestem pojebcze!

:D
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  ♂   Feb 9, 2009, 08:02pm  #

pierogi:
"cold as f__k"

Piździ jak w Keleckym na banhłofie
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  ♂   Feb 9, 2009, 08:16pm  #

Bartolome:
Piździ jak w Keleckym na banhłofie

Is that Polish pirate speak or a more correct rendering of this saying's local pronunciation?
Is it okay to say it in front of the children?
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  ♀   Edited by: ladykangaroo  Feb 9, 2009, 08:55pm  #

piździ jak w kieleckim na dworcu (na bahnhofie is from German and not so commonly used)

Most children would use it with no hesitation at all.

Bahnhof:



..and bonus track (1:47):
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  ♂   Feb 9, 2009, 09:01pm  #

ladykangaroo:
Most children would use it with no hesitation at all.

The question is not "do children use this expression?" but "is it actually acceptable in polite society where children may be present?"
My girlfriend tells me off for saying things that I think aren't too bad, then I hear her say things that to me, sound even worse in front of the kids. I've never been able to find out exactly at what level piździ is.

ladykangaroo:
(na bahnhofie is from German and not so commonly used)

But in Silesian?
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  ♀   Edited by: ladykangaroo  Feb 9, 2009, 09:48pm  #

osiol:
The question is not "do children use this expression?" but "is it actually acceptable in polite society where children may be present?"

And the answer is: children are using it without hesitation. It's very colloquial and presently does not implicate anything vulgar or indecent. The "polite" society does not use colloquial language at all or does it very rarely. It really depends on how touchy are the people you are talking to and to what extent they pose. Children are generally at ease with the informal language and their connotations are fascinating and flexible. Some adults tend to think that kids should not be addressed in informal way ‘cause it would derogate the status of the elders and children are supposed to know only the language which allows them to address others in respectful manner. If you are amongst old-fashioned people who identify respect / manners with elaborate, literary style – I would not use “piździ”. Otherwise you are fine, regardless of the fact if there are children present or not.

osiol:
But in Silesian?

In Silesian, maybe.
That still means that is not as common as the first version which is used more or less everywhere in Poland.
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  ♂   Feb 9, 2009, 09:54pm  #

osiol:
But in Silesian?

Bullseye. Or donkeyseye.
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  ♂   Feb 9, 2009, 11:16pm  #

I don't think it is acceptable to use it in front of children, word "piździ" or often used "pizga" comes from the word "pizda" which is actually a pussy or a pranny..
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  ♀   Edited by: ladykangaroo  Feb 10, 2009, 12:05am  #

frd:
word "piździ" or often used "pizga" comes from the word "pizda" which is actually a pussy

Actually it is much older than "pizda", it simply changed its meaning with time. "Piździć" (and "pizgać" as well) used to mean "to grumble". Nothing to do with pussy, but I'm sure Mr. Freud would write a nice elaborate piece on this type of connotations :D
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  ♂   Feb 10, 2009, 12:20am  #

;) sorry for my parochial approach earlier, but still, I think that most people will associate "pizdzi" with it's dirty cousin...
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  ♂   Feb 10, 2009, 12:35am  #

ladykangaroo:
Actually it is much older than "pizda"

... which is itself an ancient word. Just because it is deemed to be rude doesn't mean it doesn't have roots all the way back to the hypothesised proto-Indo-European. Well, maybe.
Guest     Feb 11, 2009, 08:17pm  #

goopi coyal ? stupid fuck ?
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  ♀   Feb 12, 2009, 03:20pm  #

maybe he means glupi chuje?
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  ♂   Feb 21, 2009, 07:30pm  #

marcinek:
Hello,
I found this forum in trying to find a Polish word, that I thought was slang. If someone can help? The word meant "unpleasant surprise" with the meaning more toward the way find out you just crapped in your pants is a surprise. I thought it began with a Z. Thank you for all your help!

LOL! I heard this phrase many times in my life. The way that I remember it was (zesralem sie w gatki) This may not be the way true poles say it but ,but this is how my immigrant father said it.
( I pooped in my drawers)
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  ♀   Feb 28, 2009, 03:23pm  #

what about pierdolonim...i know it's rude but how would u translate it best?

and Spadaj?
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  ♂   Feb 28, 2009, 03:25pm  #

Po pierdolonym, hmm, yes it's rude ;) The stem is fuck or fucking.

Spadaj is like get lost
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  ♀   Feb 28, 2009, 03:28pm  #

hahah thanks ...what part of speech is it or can you just throw it in anywhere?
bab     Mar 17, 2009, 02:58pm  #

My grandmother said it meant "devil sh*t". It loses something in translation but it was suppose to be a major swear word.
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  ♂   Mar 17, 2009, 03:16pm  #

McCoy:
?? maybe jebać (to) - which means fu&k it

Not f*ck this?
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  ♂   Mar 23, 2009, 07:18pm  #

Looking for help - "Holetta"

My polish mother in law always used to say "Oh, Holetta!" but I never knew what it meant. When she said it, it would be in the same context as I might say "Oh Christ!" or "Oh for cryin' out loud!".

Can anybody tell me what "Holetta" means?
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  ♀   Mar 23, 2009, 07:24pm  #

rpatte42:
"Oh, Holetta!"

oh, cholera!
Rafal_1981     Edited by: Rafal_1981  Mar 23, 2009, 07:32pm  #

wypierdalaj stąd albo dostaniesz kopa na twarz

which means:

get the fcuk out of here or I'll kick your face off


Thank you for your attention
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  ♂   Mar 23, 2009, 07:36pm  #

Rafal_1981:
get the fcuk out of here or I'll kick your face off

Shouldn't it be, kick "in" your face?
Rafal_1981     Mar 23, 2009, 08:01pm  #

Filios1:
Shouldn't it be, kick "in" your face?

both forms are acceptable (and both are equally painful :-])


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