Polaron - Get Polish Citizenship / EU Passport now!Witamy, Poland Guest  |  Members

The Unofficial Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives

Welcome to Poland!
Home / Language /answers: 1,227 - page 40 of 41

Polish Swear Words

f stop Threads: 32
Posts: 3,479
Joined: Dec 9, 2009
  ♀ Jan 14, 2010, 01:08am  #

that's funny!
luvapole   Jan 16, 2010, 01:52am  #

My friend of over 20 years has called me something, but has never told me what it means. Please forgive my phonetic spelling... it may or may not be a swear word or something bad, but I have a feeling it is ;p

sma-SHUSH-key

Thank you!

P.S. and if it is bad, what should I call him in return?! :)
frd Threads: 7
Posts: 1,791
Joined: Feb 3, 2009
  ♂ Jan 16, 2010, 01:13pm  #

luvapole:
sma-SHUSH-key

I have absolutely no clue what this might mean, doesn't sound like a polish word to me ;) You've probably misheard something or put the wrong pronunciation in. Beside some people are inventing their own words by adding something to a normal polish word.. if it was "SHUSH-key" it could mean "piddle".. by I highly doubt that and it wouldn't make any sense ;) for me it carries a certain notion of "smażenie" - "frying" but doesn't make any sense either.. take a voice recorder to your next meeting :P
gumishu Threads: 18
Posts: 4,501
Joined: Apr 6, 2009
  ♂ Edited by: gumishu  Jan 18, 2010, 06:36pm  #

luvapole
luvapole:
sma-SHUSH-key

smaczniutki????

very tasty (tongue tickling way) ;)
marqoz Threads: -
Posts: 217
Joined: Feb 4, 2010
  ♂ Feb 4, 2010, 12:51pm  #

There were question about etymology of the word: kurwa.

There are 2 hypotheses:
1) From Protoslavic (and still used in Poland and many other Slavic languages) word KUR meaning COCK, postfix -WA means collective noun.
Calling a woman kurwa used to suggest that she knows many cocks=males ie. was a prostitute or a lascivious one. (French word COCOTTE has analogical history.)

2) From Latin word CURVA meaning CURVE or ASKEW - suggesting that the way of life of kurwa wasn't so straight - ie. with many curves and bits on the side.
Recently this hypothesis is treated as obsolete popular ad-ideation.
gumishu Threads: 18
Posts: 4,501
Joined: Apr 6, 2009
  ♂ Feb 4, 2010, 02:28pm  #

marqoz:
There were question about etymology of the word: kurwa.

There are 2 hypotheses:
1) From Protoslavic (and still used in Poland and many other Slavic languages) word KUR meaning COCK, postfix -WA means collective noun.
Calling a woman kurwa used to suggest that she knows many cocks=males ie. was a prostitute or a lascivious one. (French word COCOTTE has analogical history.)

neither of these etymologies makes sense marqoz - kurwa is the root word in Germanic languages - (k changed into h or wh in Geramanic history in some half of vocabulary - and you have now whore and eine Hure)
-ew (later changed into -va) was an ending that defined the feminine in a number of words (stągiew, panew, łagiew and kotwa, pochwa - are all feminine)

as the word is shared by Slavic and Germanic languages (Romance languages have different words) the most probable possibility is Slavs have borrowed it from Gothic folk when they were neighbours (and they were close neighbours in the history for quite some time)
marqoz Threads: -
Posts: 217
Joined: Feb 4, 2010
  ♂ Feb 5, 2010, 01:10am  #

gumishu:
neither of these etymologies makes sense marqoz

Thank you for your good word, Gumishu.

So my hypothesis are crap and only you have possessed this deep reaching insight in the past far before the history started, before barbarians of Germanic or Slavonic origin even know how to read. Nice to meet somebody with these skills.

Take it easy - it is only etymology - and with languages with so short history like Germanic and moreover Slavonic - you have only hypotheses out there.

And you are right that Latin hypothesis is funny one - some folk staff but very old one. It was very popular from early modern times together with another explanation for curva meaning corner - you know where all working girls stand.

I can tolerate your German root proposal but only as one more hypothesis - let it be number 3). I have heard about that - but it has no clear phonetic path from Gothic HORS to Slavonic KUREW.

But we have one more and very promising hypothesis:
4) In very old Polish KUR = cock and KUREW = hen
If Polish KUR, English COCK and Latin PETUX mean male gender of chicken,
and if simultaneously all these words mean also penis,
so KUREW could mean also the complement or other part of penis or vagina.

Now we are just close to final association and here you are:
If KOGUT = rooster or penis - is used to call a horny man or a cocksman in slangish,
so KUREW = hen or vagina - could be used to call a whore or a c*nt in slangish.
It is some kind of pars-pro-toto association.

And, hello, Gumishu, suffix -WA sometimes is a transformed female noun form with -EW (it could be the case of kurew) but in the other words it could be a collectiva like in DZIATWA = all the children, GĘSTWA - all the shrub, LITWA - all the Lithuanians, TATARWA - all the Tartars.
gumishu Threads: 18
Posts: 4,501
Joined: Apr 6, 2009
  ♂ Edited by: gumishu  Feb 5, 2010, 06:53pm  #

marqoz:
I can tolerate your German root proposal but only as one more hypothesis - let it be number 3). I have heard about that - but it has no clear phonetic path from Gothic HORS to Slavonic KUREW.

ok agreed - let's assume it comes from some Urindoeuropean root which evolved differently in Germanic languages and Slavic languages - this sounds pretty plausible, Slavic languages probably then retained the more archaic version (remember k- h change in proto-Germanic)

yes you are right that phonetically there could not be change from *ho/ur to kurew - all other borrowings from Gothic dialects attest that Geramnic h/ch were retained in Slavic as ch (see chlew, chleb - I know these examples)

having said all that I am not a professional linguist

marqoz:
LITWA - all the Lithuanians,

i doubt it is collectivum in this case - in my eyes it just seems shortening of Lietuva - I doubt Lithuanians borrowed the name of their country from their Slavic neighbours - it is however true that the word Litwa acted as a collectivum in Slavic languages

never heard of Tatarwa collectivum but I guess you didn't make it up
marqoz Threads: -
Posts: 217
Joined: Feb 4, 2010
  ♂ Feb 6, 2010, 10:32am  #

gumishu:
I doubt Lithuanians borrowed the name of their country from their Slavic neighbours - it is however true that the word Litwa acted as a collectivum in Slavic languages

You're probably right. The root of Lietuva is probably of Baltic origin.
Wikipedia proposes "Since the word Lietuva has a suffix (-uva), the original word should have no suffix. A likely candidate is Lietā." However the ending could Slavonic as well. If not it was well assimilated and used together with Moskwa, Tatarwa.

In old Polish also MOSKWA was used as a collectivum:
Moskwa się pocza dziwować skąd się wziął, jednakże rozumieli, że go do tego czasu było utajono. [from the period of Dymitriada (wars with Muscovy 1604-1610]

And TATARWA: ..niedola nas ściga, najechała wraża tatarwa. A kozak śpi.. (Bolesław Londyński, Bajki Słowiańskie); see also: Stanisław Vincenz, Prawda Starowieku.
confused5767   Feb 17, 2010, 07:08am  #

idk how to spell it, but sounded out it is "goopia cheifka"...what the hell does that mean?!
asik Threads: 2
Posts: 513
Joined: Feb 17, 2009
  ♀ Feb 17, 2010, 08:01am  #

confused5767:
goopia cheifka"

Głupia dziwka

głupia - stupid
dziwka -strumpet/whore/slut
spall   Feb 23, 2010, 03:55am  #

My grandfather used to say (this is phonetic spelling) "doo-pai-azsh" when he was referring to an idiot or moron. Can anyone help me figure out what this word is?
Also, he would say (again, phonetically) "cope-niente" when referring to someone who was crazy/messed up in the head. Any help here?
Thank you! :)
strzyga Threads: 4
Posts: 1,311
Joined: Apr 30, 2008
  ♀ Feb 23, 2010, 04:31am  #

spall:
"doo-pai-azsh"

dupa Jaś
literally, Johnny the arsehole

spall:
"cope-niente"

kopnięty/kopnięta/kopnięte, depending on the gender
literally: kicked
Peter KRK   Feb 23, 2010, 11:16am  #

There is also an explanation by prof. Krawczuk for the term KURWA: In the middleage Cracow hookers served close to the city walls (MUR obronny) an they were called MURWA. After a 500 years and a small change we have: KURWA=hooker. Word MUR have a German origin so we are going back to Germany.
marqoz Threads: -
Posts: 217
Joined: Feb 4, 2010
  ♂ Feb 24, 2010, 12:55am  #

Peter KRK:
Krawczuk for the term KURWA: In the middleage Cracow hookers served close to the city walls (MUR obronny) an they were called MURWA. After a 500 years and a small change we have: KURWA=hooker. Word MUR have a German origin so we are going back to Germany.

Once again Krawczuk missed the point. If it was from Mur/Mauer, why is it so popular in all Slavonic languages, even in these having no contact with German.

According to Linde (1808) is quite the opposite: murwa is to soften the word (or to replace a taboo word kurwa).
He cited funny proverbs:
Ożenił się kołodziey, pojął murwę sam złodziey. (A wheelwright married one, took a whore while himself a thief.)
Póty murwa miłuie, póki w mieszku czuie. (Whore loves till she sniffs out money).
Poland man   Feb 25, 2010, 06:50pm  #

Listen to people
One truth in life.

"Kurwa-Is more than a thousand for keywords"
Jimbob100   Mar 6, 2010, 12:21pm  #

Everyone Kurwa Mac, gowno,spierdalaj all swear words i am, a true pole email me at joshuaward99@sky.com
zajm77   Mar 9, 2010, 01:29am  #

Mas z fajna dupe. please can you tell me what this means please a friend of mine said its the only polish he knows lol thank you ;0)
Bzibzioh   Mar 9, 2010, 01:31am  #

zajm77:
Mas z fajna dupe.

You have fascinating personality.
polishsoccer Threads: -
Posts: 5
Joined: Mar 5, 2010
  ♀ Mar 9, 2010, 03:22am  #

haha swięta krowa, holy cow
skysoulmate Threads: 27
Posts: 2,372
Joined: Jan 10, 2010
  ♂ Edited by: skysoulmate  Mar 9, 2010, 03:37am  #

Maciej:
I think Polish people overall don't swear as much as other nations (e.g.. Americans). I mean - when Poles swear, they are really angry or something while American use the f*ck word on any occasion.. :}. There are exceptions of course - come to Poland and take a walk in the evening by a liquor store or forest preserve

Interesting, I was about to say the opposite... In my view New Yorkers and Californians curse a lot but overall I think Poles curse much more than the average American...
beckski Threads: 19
Posts: 1,911
Joined: May 15, 2007
  ♀ Mar 9, 2010, 03:39am  #

skysoulmate:
Californians curse a lot

Frankly, I don't know what the f-ck you're talking about, lol!
skysoulmate Threads: 27
Posts: 2,372
Joined: Jan 10, 2010
  ♂ Mar 9, 2010, 03:42am  #

beckski:
Frankly, I don't know what the f-ck you're talking about, lol!

Yeah, you def. sound like someone from Kalifooornia... LOL
skysoulmate Threads: 27
Posts: 2,372
Joined: Jan 10, 2010
  ♂ Edited by: skysoulmate  Mar 9, 2010, 04:00am  #

osiol:
I occasionally pop in an infix. These don't normally exist in English - where you add something into the middle of a word. The target word has to be long enough to justify having this extra portion added. It is normally a fairly innocent word that just needs a little spicing up for the occasion.

These words absofukin'lutely do exist! LOL
marqoz Threads: -
Posts: 217
Joined: Feb 4, 2010
  ♂ Mar 9, 2010, 03:02pm  #

skysoulmate:
In my view New Yorkers and Californians curse a lot but overall I think Poles curse much more than the average American...

Interesting observation. However may I ask if you did eliminate class differences. I risk hypothesis that most of your Polish test sample was from proletariat while NYers and CAns from your sample were from mixed class with middle class prevalence.

My hypothesis is Poles are less cursing people than American when comparing adequate social classes but I have no idea how to prove it ;-)
skysoulmate Threads: 27
Posts: 2,372
Joined: Jan 10, 2010
  ♂ Edited by: skysoulmate  Mar 10, 2010, 02:28am  #

marqoz:
Interesting observation. However may I ask if you did eliminate class differences. I risk hypothesis that most of your Polish test sample was from proletariat while NYers and CAns from your sample were from mixed class with middle class prevalence.

My hypothesis is Poles are less cursing people than American when comparing adequate social classes but I have no idea how to prove it ;-)

Your hypothesis is (in my view ;) flawed and I have no idea how to prove it either.. LOL


Seriously though, I fly for a living and get to meet many people but I seldom stop to inquire about their class status. From my observations cursing in the US is definitely an East coast & West coat phenomenon. Note, people curse everywhere but New Yorkers and Californians put it to extreme. Maybe they're just pissed because they have the highest taxes in the nation? I don't know...

However, whenever I hear the Polish language whether in the US or Europe or Asia (MANY Poles in Shanghai, Singapore and Kuala Lumpur) I always try to stop by to say hello and attempt to practice - I mean butcher - my Polish. More often than not before I reach the table, corner, etc. I hear 'kurva' this and 'kurva' that, 'cholera', 'wpierdole', 'huj', etc, etc. I don't know what their "class status" is but surprisingly often I'll hear female voices cursing too.

In fact, a few times I was totally perplexed as I see this seemingly classy lady, dressed to kill who appears to be an attorney, a business woman, etc. yet the words out of her mouth are as sharp and foul as a sailor's lingo.

Note, my observation is extremely unscientific and maybe I simply have very bad luck and always (or often) seem to run into potty-mouthed Poles? Not criticizing either way, just pure observation and a reply to "Maciej" who earlier said:

"...I think Polish people overall don't swear as much as other nations (e.g.. Americans). I mean - when Poles swear, they are really angry or something while American use the f*ck word on any occasion.. :}. There are exceptions of course - come to Poland and take a walk in the evening by a liquor store or forest preserve..."
Sasha Threads: 2
Posts: 1,526
Joined: Apr 19, 2008
  ♂ Mar 10, 2010, 08:52am  #

skysoulmate:
'huj'

I wonder how rude is it in Polish? From a Russian perspective I should say that "huj"in Russian is much "heavier" than f-words in English. That always bears a negative meaning and represents a person who says it the negative way.
cinek Threads: 2
Posts: 376
Joined: Nov 16, 2007
  ♂ Mar 10, 2010, 12:53pm  #

Sasha:
"huj"in Russian is much "heavier" than f-words in English. That always bears a negative meaning and represents a person who says it the negative way.

In Polish too.

Cinek
frd Threads: 7
Posts: 1,791
Joined: Feb 3, 2009
  ♂ Mar 10, 2010, 03:38pm  #

Sasha:
"huj"

It's a gutter speech word, even posh people swear sometimes and they would never use this word.. it makes people who use it seem dumb and uneducated...
skysoulmate Threads: 27
Posts: 2,372
Joined: Jan 10, 2010
  ♂ Mar 11, 2010, 05:13am  #

frd:
It's a gutter speech word, even posh people swear sometimes and they would never use this word.. it makes people who use it seem dumb and uneducated...

Agree...


Home / Language / Unanswered [this forum]


This thread is closed.