Polaron - Get Polish Citizenship / EU Passport now!Witamy, Guest  |  Members

The Ultimate Guide to POLAND
Unanswered  |  Archives

Poland News and Events
Home / Language /answers: 26

Weso貫go Alleluja or Weso造ch 安i徠?

Polonius3 Threads: 1,150
Posts: 7,015
Joined: Apr 11, 2008
  ♂   Apr 7, 2012, 01:02pm  #1

From my observation Weso造ch 安i徠 (used in December to mean Happy Christmas) is used between Poles these days to mean Happy Easter more often than the traditonal Weso貫go Alleluja. Although both main tabloids -- Fakt and Super Express -- have Weso貫go Alleluja on their front pages today, workmates, friends, neighbours, etc. usually just say Weso造ch 安i徠..
Was the Weso造ch 安i徠 something the PRL-ites pushed like the way they created a 安i皻o Umarlak闚 or some such nonsense in place of Wszystkich 安i皻ych.
Perhaps a glance at pre-war Polish Easter greeting cards would show whether that hypothesis is true.


Hipis Threads: -
Posts: 298
Joined: Apr 3, 2012
  ♂   Apr 7, 2012, 01:23pm  #2

I was born and brought up in the UK and I have always used the phrase for both feasts.

gumishu Threads: 17
Posts: 4,563
Joined: Apr 6, 2009
  ♂ Moderator   Apr 7, 2012, 01:28pm  #3

I have never heard any person use Weso貫go Alleluja in any setting in person to person situations - Weso貫go Alleluja is just a print fancy thing (or a clergy speak after the mass)

OperaFan Threads: 1
Posts: 3
Joined: Apr 7, 2012
  ♂   Apr 7, 2012, 05:22pm  #4

Well, I grew up in Poland and can tell, that both phrases are correct.
Commonly Poles say Wesolych Swiat, the phrase Wesolego Alleluja is determined by the influence of the church, and most of all is to see rather on postcards.

rybnik Threads: 33
Posts: 2,058
Joined: Jan 16, 2011
  ♂   Apr 7, 2012, 07:30pm  #5

gumishu:
I have never heard any person use Weso貫go Alleluja in any setting in person to person situations - Weso貫go Alleluja is just a print fancy thing (or a clergy speak after the mass)

During my 7 years in PRL-Poland, Weso貫go Alleluja was used quite often in Wroc豉w and Zielona G鏎a where I spent most of my time.

mafketis Threads: 16
Posts: 1,857
Joined: Mar 31, 2008
  ♂   Apr 7, 2012, 07:37pm  #6

I've never heard Weso貫go Alleluja in Poznan, just Weso造ch 安i徠 (maybe Wielkanocnych added).

Sometimes people forego all of that with friends and just wish each other "Smacznego jajka i mokrego dyngusa" (tasty egg and wet Easter Monday)

a.k.     Apr 7, 2012, 08:18pm  #7

Polonius3:
From my observation Weso造ch 安i徠 (used in December to mean Happy Christmas)


NO IT DOESNT MEAN "HAPPY CHRISTMAS"!!! It means "Happy Holidays"!
You wanted to write something smart and it turned out to be completely opposite. Polish is not English. "安i皻a" means "holidays" not "Christmas". Christmas is Bo瞠 Narodzenie. 安i皻o is any holiday (religious or not). It's a universal word.
As someone earlier wrote "Weso貫go Alleluja" is a postcard wish. No one rather says it when seeing people. It just sounds flamboyant.
If someone has more time to wish decent wishes then say "篡cz Panu/Pani radosnych i spokojnych 安i徠 Wielkiej Nocy."

Polonius3:
Perhaps a glance at pre-war Polish Easter greeting cards would show whether that hypothesis is true.


That's because they ARE GREETING CARDS! Weso貫go Alleluja is still a greeting card standard wish. How do you know that before war people didn't say "Happy holidays" on Easter when seeing a neighbour?

Polonius3:
安i皻o Umarlak闚


What's that? Do you know that word umarlak is colloquial and disrespectful? Such word certainly couldn't be used as a name for All Saints. Besides that Wszystkich 安i皻ych is not the same as 安i皻o Zmar造ch.

vizirek Threads: -
Posts: 4
Joined: Apr 7, 2012
  ♂   Apr 7, 2012, 09:16pm  #8

We use "Weso造ch 鈍i徠" and "Weso貫go alleluja". Both are correct. But we usually use in Christmas, but nothing will happen when you say "weso造ch 鈍i徠" in easter.

BiggRobb     Apr 8, 2012, 06:15pm  #9

Weso造ch 安i徠 is the typical Christmas greeting but it literraly means Joy to the world and that is why it is used on Easter because you can say Joy to the World cause Jesus rose from the dead.. Polish people are Catholic and some of the translation of grammar and speech can be better explained by explaing the religious connection..
This is why some even translate Weso造ch 安i徠 as Happy Holidays which also clareifys it okay to say on Easter as well!

So to sum it up you can use both; sometimes different people from different parts of Poland use one or the other but both are acceptable. In Church the Priests say Weso貫go Alleluja because it fits the enviorment. And on store banners it will say the same, it's more formal but to your friends and family as well as your neighbors Weso造ch 安i徠 is the way to go!

mafketis Threads: 16
Posts: 1,857
Joined: Mar 31, 2008
  ♂   Apr 8, 2012, 11:02pm  #10

BiggRobb:
t it literraly means Joy to the world


Weso造ch 鈍i徠 most certainly does not mean "joy to the world" (which would be rado嗆 鈍iatu, which sounds kind of dumb and awkward).

Weso造ch 鈍i徠 means "(I wish you) happy holidays". The plural IIRC refers to the fact that both major Christian holidays (Christmas and Easter) are celebrated for two days (at least!) in Poland.

Branek Drzyzgow     Mar 31, 2013, 02:32pm  #11

I think we should consult with Lenusz Gomulka of Chicago Push. Len?

ZIMMY Threads: 9
Posts: 2,077
Joined: Feb 21, 2009
  ♂   Mar 31, 2013, 03:37pm  #12

Technically, it means " Happy World" which doesn't translate too well into English. Literal transfers of language sometimes add confusion (and worse) between people(s). I'm sure that more than one war has been started by such mistakes.

Polson Threads: 11
Posts: 2,598
Joined: May 9, 2007
  ♂   Mar 31, 2013, 06:11pm  #13

ZIMMY:
Technically, it means " Happy World" which doesn't translate too well into English.

It's not 鈍iat, it's 鈍i﹀, I think it comes more from 'saints' than 'world', but maybe I'm wrong. Someone should find the etymology (I tried, but not that easy when you don't master Polish).

Lenka Threads: 3
Posts: 1,245
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
  ♀   Edited by: Lenka  Mar 31, 2013, 06:22pm  #14

Polson:
It's not 鈍iat, it's 鈍i﹀, I think it comes more from 'saints' than 'world',

You're right and the translation is Happy Holidays

Polson Threads: 11
Posts: 2,598
Joined: May 9, 2007
  ♂   Mar 31, 2013, 06:23pm  #15

Thanks Lenka ;)

Lyzko     Mar 31, 2013, 11:34pm  #16

What then is the appropriate response to, say, "Mokrego 妃igusa Dyngusia!"? I've always been curious about that, but simply felt embarrassed about asking my Polish colleagues. They know I'm Jewish, by the way, and in fact just got finished wishing me "Weso造ch 安i徠 Pesacha!" I couldn't very well have responded "Nawzajem!", now, could I? A ticklish situation.
lol

WielkiPolak Threads: 63
Posts: 715
Joined: Jun 3, 2011
  ♂   Edited by: WielkiPolak  Apr 1, 2013, 12:36am  #17

a.k.:
安i皻o is any holiday (religious or not). It's a universal word.


Really? I always relate the word '鈍i皻o' with holy. If someone tells me 'dzisiaj jest wielke 鈍i皻o,' I assume they mean it is a holy day for whatever reason. Even when you here them use a phrase like 'wielkie 鈍i皻o pi趾i no積ej,' as an example, they mean it is almost like a 'holy day'/very important day in football.

1jola Threads: 28
Posts: 2,611
Joined: Sep 23, 2008
  ♂   Apr 1, 2013, 09:51am  #18

Lyzko:
"Weso造ch 安i徠 Pesacha!" I couldn't very well have responded "Nawzajem!", now, could I? A ticklish situation.

Right, but if you respond "Weso造ch 安i徠" everyone is happy.

Re; the OP, both terms are used, but mainly "Weso造ch 安i徠.

"
Lyzko:
What then is the appropriate response to, say, "Mokrego 妃igusa Dyngusia!"?

"Weso貫go Prima Aprilis" in jest.

Lyzko     Apr 1, 2013, 10:19pm  #19

Many thanks, Jolu:-) Thought it was something like "Szcz窷cie Bo瞠!" or something like that. Guess I was wrong (again)LOL
Hope you had a "wet" Easter, by the way. Seems this distinctly Polish tradition has no equivalent in English or other languages. The theme of "baptismal cleansing" though on the occasion of Christ's resurrection following Lent and Holy Week might be significant.

Any ideas?

Lenka Threads: 3
Posts: 1,245
Joined: Nov 17, 2009
  ♀   Apr 1, 2013, 10:58pm  #20

1jola:
"Weso貫go Prima Aprilis" in jest.

Only this year :)

milawi     Apr 1, 2013, 11:20pm  #21

Lyzko:
Hope you had a "wet" Easter, by the way
so now we know who's to blame for this Easter weather ;)

Lyzko     Apr 1, 2013, 11:43pm  #22

Funny, milawi!
Or as my German nanny used to chide me for not finishing my supper regularly, "So YOU'RE the one who's making it rain all day!"
:-)

cinek Threads: 2
Posts: 381
Joined: Nov 16, 2007
  ♂   Apr 2, 2013, 02:22pm  #23

BiggRobb:
Polish people are Catholic and some of the translation of grammar and speech can be better explained by explaing the religious connection..


Don't exaggerate. We're not so much catholic to change our language to fit religious rules :-)

Cinek

Lyzko     Apr 2, 2013, 08:12pm  #24

Nevertheless Cinek, a language as homogeneous as Polish for example, may not acknowledge the sort of religious pluricity as, for instance, English, might:-) After all, we in the US are practiced with the melting pot for umpteen years, Poles (not to mention most Europeans) aren't!

Mazsolika Threads: -
Posts: 11
Joined: Mar 20, 2012
  ♀   May 8, 2013, 12:17am  #25

If anyone dosn't like "Weso貫go Alleluja!" as a very common way of greeting someone before and at the Easter time in Poland, I would like to add only that I have a family in podkarpackie voievodship and they used to say even more because sth like this at all Easter time: "Chrystus Zmartwychwsta" to what people answer: "Prawdziwie zmartwychwsta", sometimes even they add more but I don't really know all of it....

Lyzko     May 8, 2013, 01:56am  #26

I've even heard Polish children wish one another "Weso造ch jajkach!", but I presume it's meant as a joke?

Mazsolika Threads: -
Posts: 11
Joined: Mar 20, 2012
  ♀   Edited by: Mazsolika  May 8, 2013, 03:15am  #27

Probably you mean: "Weso造ch jajek, jajeczek, barank闚, pisanek, zaj帷zk闚..." and all the rest Easter symbols from little poems which are sometimes sent as wishes before the Easter.


Home / Language / Unanswered [this forum]

Weso貫go Alleluja or Weso造ch 安i徠?

  Important: If you post a link to a non-English source, please ALWAYS summarize / translate the relevant parts into English!  

To post as guest, enter a temporary and unique username (without password) or login and post as a member.