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Education in Poland - system and structure

Ivonka Threads: 10
Posts: 4
Joined: Oct 27, 2006
  ♀   Apr 30, 2007, 07:33pm  #1

Each country has its own system of education usually administered by the Minister of Education. In this paper, I am going to deal with Polish education and describe the most important aspects of this system in my country.

The Polish Constitution states that everybody has the right to learn. In Poland learning is obligatory until one is 18 years old and attending state schools is free.

In 1999, a new structure and reform of education was introduced and now we have:

Przedszkole (kindergarten) is for children at the age of 3 to 6. However, the last year, which is called "zerówka" ("zero class") is obligatory and it somehow prepares kids to school.

Szkoła podstawowa (primary school) lasts 6 years. First, children have kształcenie zintegrowane (combined teaching) for 3 years when they are taught by only one teacher. Then, they have 3 more years and now the teachers change depending on the subject. There is also one special teacher - wychowawca (home-room teacher) who is responsible for his/her class.

The subjects children learn when in classes IV-VI are:

- język polski (Polish)
- język obcy nowożytny (Modern Foreign Language)
- matematyka (Maths)
- przyroda (Natural History)
- historia i społeczeństwo (History and Society)
- muzyka (Music)
- plastyka (Art.)
- technika (Technology)
- informatyka (Computer Studies)
- wychowanie fizyczne or W-F (Physical Education)
- religia (Religious Education) - parents decide whether children attend it or not
- wychowanie do życia w rodzinie (Education to Family Life).

Gimnazjum (junior high school) is attended by teenagers aged 13-16. They learn the same subjects as in primary school, but there are also:

- historia (History)
- wiedza o społeczeństwie (Personal and Social Education)
- fizyka z astronomią (Physics and Astronomy)
- chemia (Chemistry)
- biologia (Biology)
- geografia (Geography).

Egzamin gimnazjalny (junior high school leaving exam) finishes this three-year period of education. It consists of two written parts: humanistyczna (humanistic) and matematyczno-przyrodnicza (mathematics-nature).

Szkoły ponadgimnazjalne (secondary schools). Here, teenagers can go to:

- zasadnicza szkoła zawodowa (basic vocational school) - 3 years - finishing this type of school young people get świadectwo ukończenia szkoly zasadniczej (the Certificate of Completion of the Basic Vocational School),

- liceum ogólnokształcące (general lyceum) - 3 years - they get świadectwo dojrzałości (Maturity Cetificate) if they manage to pass egzamin maturalny or matura (matura exam),

- liceum profilowane (specialized lyceum) - 3 years - finished by passing matura (matura exam),

- technikum (technical secondary school) - 4 years - they get świadectwo ukończenia technikum (the Certificate of Completion of the Technical Secondary School) or they can also pass matura (matura exam).

There is a tradition in Poland that 100 days before matura (matura exam) we have the so-called studniówka ('100 days ahead party'). It is a special party for students, their boyfriends/girlfiends, teachers and sometimes parents. The clothes are very smart - suits and evening dresses. Additionally, there is a custom that the girls should wear czerwona podwiązka (red garter) to be lucky during exams. All such balls begin with polonez (polonaise).

Polish students are graded on a 1-6 scale and thus, they can get:

1 - niedostateczny (unsatisfactory/fail),
2 - dopuszczający (poor),
3 - dostateczny (satisfactory),
4 - dobry (good),
5 - bardzo dobry (very good),
6 - celujący (excellent).

Undoubtedly, the most important exam in the Polish education system is matura (matura exam) as it gives people the opportunity to enter different types of universities, colleges and other high schools. It consists of two parts: ustna (oral) and pisemna (written).

It is said that we learn as long as we live and it is true. It seems to me that the period when we go to various kinds of schools is the most essential for our future life. There we learn basic things and laws, get to know the surrounding world, discover our abilities and skills and finally, meet a lot of people who play a very big role in our present, and sometimes also future life. That is why the system of education should be well planned and organized and the people who work with children and teenagers ought to be chosen carefully.

Ivonka


Kochanie Jen Threads: -
Posts: 18
Joined: Apr 28, 2007
  ♀   Apr 30, 2007, 07:37pm  #2

School teaches you a lesson in life and life teaches you a lesson

kpusa1981 Threads: -
Posts: 1
Joined: Oct 13, 2007
  ♀   Oct 13, 2007, 08:11pm  #3

Hoew was theducation in Poland pre1999?

celinski Threads: 58
Posts: 2,395
Joined: Nov 14, 2007
  ♀   Dec 3, 2007, 06:41am  #4

Are teachers honest about Polands 1939-45 history now that Poland is free?

Thanks, Carol

ukpolska     Dec 3, 2007, 08:32am  #5

Quoting: celinski

Are teachers honest about Polands 1939-45 history now that Poland is free?

What do you mean by honest celinski?

plk123 Threads: 15
Posts: 5,397
Joined: Aug 29, 2007
  ♂   Dec 3, 2007, 09:37am  #6

Quoting: kpusa1981
Hoew was theducation in Poland pre1999?

i thought it was very good.
Quoting: celinski
Are teachers honest about Polands 1939-45 history now that Poland is free?

when weren't they? they sure were in my school during the commy times.

celinski Threads: 58
Posts: 2,395
Joined: Nov 14, 2007
  ♀   Dec 3, 2007, 09:50am  #7

I keep hearing the wrong information about what took place (eastern Poland) and what role the Polish military played and did for the country. It is the younger generation that seem to be misinformed. It is as if "Stalin" feed the false information and no one has educated them as to what their family really went through.

I was talking to one 16 year old in Poland and she thought the Jewish were the only ones that were hurt. If you look at my post trying to put a name on 1939-45 deportation by Stalin to Siberia, just the fact that this many family's were destroyed and "not even a name". Google what to do a project on this group? Lets see , "Kresy", "Galicia ethnic cleansing" , maybe if I try immigration.

Not even a NAME. This many people abused the way they were. I have sent a letter to the Polish President last week asking that Feb. 10, 1940 can be added to Polands days to take a few moments of silence, ring church bells, light candles or simply mention us. Jewish Holocaust did not include us or this would not be an issue. Roman Catholic and Greek Catholic are not to be forgotten. Thankfully "Katyn" now has a name for google, now I will not stop until we do.

Carol USA

celinski Threads: 58
Posts: 2,395
Joined: Nov 14, 2007
  ♀   Dec 3, 2007, 10:01am  #8

What name should we use for 1939-45 deportation of Polish to Siberia? to read educational needs and thought on naming. "Forgotten Polish". ???/ "Sybiracy"Please add your thoughts on naming and read some of the ones voted on.
Carol

ukpolska     Dec 3, 2007, 10:04am  #9

I think all the points that you have raised here are taught in Polish schools according to my wife's 16 yr old sister, but it really depends on the teacher. For example I know that at some time she had to go to a concentration camp in Majdanek near Lublin, and if you go there you can clearly see that it was not just Jews that were killed.

Also, they had a grandparents week where the Grandparents would come in and tell stories of the 2nd world war and communist times. I am not saying this goes on in every school because I do not know, but it is happening in some. :O)

celinski Threads: 58
Posts: 2,395
Joined: Nov 14, 2007
  ♀   Dec 3, 2007, 10:28am  #10

Quoting: ukpolska
taught in Polish schools according to my wife's 16 yr old sister, but it really depends on the teacher.


I pray someday all the children in the nation will know and learn from example what should never happen. In the US due to "no prayer in school" history is not the truth. We sould not be able to ignor what happened and this in part I am sure is due to shame on US for not helping Poland. Ignorance I fear is nation wide. Has Ukraine SS taken responsabily for killing of Polish families? This is such a touchy subject. Has Russia showed remorse and taken responsabilty? I understand that "Stalin" is not in power and do not hold the present administration responsable. Yet they are responsable for admitting and restitution should be made to Poland. Ukraine SS that we know brutily killed families should not be sitting in another country, but should be tried for war crimes. I may not be very popular for what I say but it is the truth.

If we continue to live with things the way they are nothing changes. Polish cannot truly trust a country that refuses to tell the truth and then our children will learn from history, Poland and Russia can start a new relationship and build trust. Others will not think they can wipe out entire families and get away with it.

When we look at this it is truly amazing that denial is still an issue. Lets face it, "Stalin" spread his victims throughout the world. Never thinking of computers and the tower of babble brought down with interpators and more important "A Free Poland" , the reason I type from the USA and not my fathers homeland, that is why my grandfather fought.

Carol/ USA

plk123 Threads: 15
Posts: 5,397
Joined: Aug 29, 2007
  ♂   Dec 3, 2007, 10:33am  #11

i guess i should say that not much info on russian attrocities done to poles were not mentioned. Katyn i only learned about after going outside of our borders.

celinski Threads: 58
Posts: 2,395
Joined: Nov 14, 2007
  ♀   Dec 3, 2007, 10:43am  #12

Now this is sad. I am working in USA. Please study this time period and demand your children are taught. Make up posters and ask your teachers to show the children. See, "A Forgotten Odyssey" demand respect for the Polish families. Russia can pretend it never happened.

Poland must remember their forefathers that died or were sent to other countries. I was just wondering what the children are told about the Kresy "Osadnik" families? Or do they even know we are gone?

Carol, USA

karolina19 Threads: -
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 8, 2008
  ♀   Mar 8, 2008, 09:40pm  #13

all my friends that went through years of school in poland and then moved abroad we very educated compared to the students in new countries. they also adjusted very well when it came to university

tornado2007 Threads: 18
Posts: 3,179
Joined: Jul 11, 2007
  ♂   Mar 8, 2008, 09:55pm  #14

karolina19 wrote:

all my friends that went through years of school in poland and then moved abroad we very educated compared to the students in new countries. they also adjusted very well when it came to university

i don't understand what your saying Karolina, do you mean that the Polish people who come to the UK and USA are more educated the the British and the Americans??? or are you saying that its the otherway around?? Where are you from and where did you study?? if you dont mind me asking?? also how old are you??

karolina19 Threads: -
Posts: 2
Joined: Mar 8, 2008
  ♀   Mar 8, 2008, 10:13pm  #15

The Polish that come to the UK are more educated than the British.

osiol Threads: 57
Posts: 4,553
Joined: Jul 25, 2007
  ♂   Mar 8, 2008, 11:06pm  #16

karolina19 wrote:
The Polish that come to the UK are more educated than the British.

That's a very bold statement.

I used to sit in class looking out of a window somewhere in Britain.
Then the bloke who is now my flatmate spent his schooldays looking out of a window somewhere in Poland for his education.

Now someone go and find me the perfect education system.

Eurola Threads: 5
Posts: 2,189
Joined: Dec 2, 2006
  ♀   Mar 8, 2008, 11:18pm  #17

When I was going to school in Poland, teachers had a favorite statement for students who sat the closest to the window..."you're no eagle, you won't fly" ...so the worst students had the window and back seats :)
The best ones sat in the first row, closer to the teachers desk...

I think, we had way to much "book smart" teaching, and not enough of independent thought and reason teaching, IMHO.

tornado2007 Threads: 18
Posts: 3,179
Joined: Jul 11, 2007
  ♂   Mar 9, 2008, 10:31am  #18

karolina19 wrote:

The Polish that come to the UK are more educated than the British.

a bold statement, how about an outragous one!!! how long have you been in the UK, i bet you haven't really met to many british people because you are to busy living and mixing with only the polish in the city your living in!!!

Where are you in the UK Karolina??? How long have you been here????

I don't mind people making statements but back it up with something solid and also a bit of experience, dosen't seem to me like you have been here to long!!!!

telefonitika     Mar 9, 2008, 12:15pm  #19

karolina19 wrote:
The Polish that come to the UK are more educated than the British.


thats abit of an off remark .... the POLISH are as EDUCATED as the BRITISH or any OTHER NATIONALITY for that matter ... POLISH EDUCATION may be different to the rest of the world but this does not make you any different educationally or any more Intellectual than the rest of the world ....

talk about a superiority complex sweetheart .....

sorry i dont normally rant towards the polish but your comment was tactless !!

Dzhaklin Threads: 3
Posts: 186
Joined: Dec 3, 2007
  ♀   Edited by: Dzhaklin  Mar 9, 2008, 12:19pm  #20

tornado2007 wrote:
Where are you from and where did you study?? if you dont mind me asking?? also how old are you??


Karolina so how old are you? That sounds like a comment a teenager would make.

Wroclaw Threads: 63
Posts: 6,644
Joined: Apr 1, 2006
  ♂   Mar 9, 2008, 12:26pm  #21

karolina19 wrote:
The Polish that come to the UK are more educated than the British.


I'd like to see a European version of: Top Of The Form, Blockbusters, University Challenge.
Then we'll know the truth.

telefonitika     Mar 9, 2008, 12:34pm  #22

Wroclaw wrote:
I'd like to see a European version of: Top Of The Form, Blockbusters, University Challenge.
Then we'll know the truth.



that would be interesting ... can i have a B bob please ... :)

osiol Threads: 57
Posts: 4,553
Joined: Jul 25, 2007
  ♂   Mar 9, 2008, 12:42pm  #23

Wroclaw wrote:
I'd like to see a European version of: Top Of The Form, Blockbusters, University Challenge.

Anyone remember Going For Gold?

telefonitika     Mar 9, 2008, 12:48pm  #24

osiol wrote:
Going For Gold?



what with david kelly i believe his name was though i could be wrong ..

osiol Threads: 57
Posts: 4,553
Joined: Jul 25, 2007
  ♂   Mar 9, 2008, 12:55pm  #25

Henry Kelly

LondonChick Threads: 36
Posts: 1,238
Joined: Nov 19, 2007
  ♀   Edited by: LondonChick  Mar 9, 2008, 01:31pm  #26

osiol wrote:
Anyone remember Going For Gold?


Yes... many happy memories of watching the cheesey waves and thumbs up in the opening credits before heading off to afternoon lectures.

Ho ho ho ho.... look what I just found:



I once saw Henry Kelly in a bar, but I was out with two Aussies and an Indian... none of whom could understand why I was so excited.

telefonitika     Mar 9, 2008, 01:58pm  #27

LondonChick wrote:
LondonChick


OMFookinG LC .... thats class ...!

osiol Threads: 57
Posts: 4,553
Joined: Jul 25, 2007
  ♂   Mar 9, 2008, 07:29pm  #28

I don't know how they decided which countries should participate.
Perhaps none of the others were edumacated enough.

Mali Threads: -
Posts: 328
Joined: Mar 3, 2008
  ♀   Edited by: Mali  Mar 9, 2008, 09:40pm  #29

karolina19 wrote:
The Polish that come to the UK are more educated than the British.

I'm sure some of them are. I'm also sure that some of them aren't.
Never generalize, it just shows your ignorance.

I'm Polish and I love Poland but if Polish people were so much more educated than other nations, English being the example given here, what is with the mass exodus to other nations, England again being a prime example? Obviously, the English can't be that uneducated that people are immigrating to their region by the masses. It would be difficult to run a nation that is still one of the richest in the world if there would be so many 'dumb' people.

That being said, my mom went through the Masters program in Poland and was able to get a teaching job in Canada without a problem. She also continually get job offers to work for the board to work on the math curriculum (they're constantly changing the curriculum after every provincial election, because apparently the have nothing better to do) even though she mastered in history and not math. But then, I also know people that went through the same system as my mom and struggle to get a decent job. It also depends on the person. Not everyone is good at the same thing.



osiol wrote:

I used to sit in class looking out of a window somewhere in Britain.
Then the bloke who is now my flatmate spent his schooldays looking out of a window somewhere in Poland for his education.

Sounds like Canada too.

tornado2007 Threads: 18
Posts: 3,179
Joined: Jul 11, 2007
  ♂   Edited by: tornado2007  Mar 11, 2008, 09:26am  #30

karolina19 wrote:

karolina19

Come on Karolina, crawl out of whatever hole it was you live in and answer for what you have said, you don't seem so quick to speak now do you??? you are happy to slag our people of for not being as clever as you, however your the one who has come to this country for education, from a supposed 'better education system' which seems kind of weird to me considering your here, go figure!!!!!!

I'm pi**ed with people called Karolina, what is it about the name are all polish Karolina's either Bit*ches, stuck up, rip you off, sad, users or a mixture of all the above, whatever i'm on a Karolina strike from today!!! unless somebody can convince me otherwise and show me a Karolina who is at least half nice!!




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Education in Poland - system and structure

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